Cornell’s Equine Seminary Series presents “How Saddle Fit Affects Performance, Lameness and Shoeing”

WHAT: Steve Kraus, CJF, Head of Cornell’s Farrier Service, will help equestrians learn about the problems that are caused by a poor fitting saddle and how to correct them.

WHEN: Tuesday, September 21, 2021, 6 – 7 p.m.

WHERE: Via zoom, registration required https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/6716316467798/WN_LwetvpG5RzyMug-SYmLFeA

MEDIA: The event is free and open to the public. Media members are asked to RSVP to Len Johnson at len.johnson@cornell.edu.

 

ITHACA, N.Y. – Horse owners and farriers are very aware that poor fitting horseshoes can cause discomfort and lameness in horses. Unfortunately, many do not realize that poor fitting saddles can cause lameness, gait faults, shoeing problems and even personality problems. Ways to assure a reasonable saddle fit to prevent complications with your horse will be presented during the College of Veterinary Medicine’s Equine Seminar Series, on Tuesday, September 21 from 6 – 7 p.m. via Zoom.

 

Steve Kraus is an American Farriers Association, Certified Journeyman Farrier who has been the head of Farrier Services and a Sr. Lecturer of Large Animal Surgery, at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, and the instructor of the Farrier School there since 2010. Prior to that, he worked for over 40 years in his own farrier business in Central New York. He is known for troubleshooting lame, injured and underperforming horses and has shod horses of practically every breed and discipline. He has lectured to farriers, veterinarians and horse owners all over the US, Canada, South America and Europe. He has been a featured speaker at the International Hoof Care Summit, Laminitis Conference, Equine Affaire and the American Farriers Association Convention. Steve has written many articles published in the American Farriers Journal, The Horse Journal and The Professional Farrier. In 2016, he was inducted into the International Farriers Hall of Fame.

 

The Cornell Equine Seminar Series is presented by the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine’s Equine Hospital, the New York State 4-H Horse Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension. Held monthly, equine experts present on important equine health and management topics. The event is free and open to the public. Media members are asked to register with Len Johnson at len.johnson@cornell.edu

 

For additional information about the college, see the College of Veterinary Medicine news website.

Cornell’s Equine Seminar Series presents “5 Tips for keeping your horse sound”

WHAT: Michelle Delco, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVS, assistant research professor and equine surgery specialist, shares expert advice for horse owners on preventing lameness to keep horses sound.

WHEN: Tuesday, June 15, 2021, 6 – 7 p.m.

WHERE: Via zoom, registration required https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/9416225643191/WN_e-TIOSODRKmWi-huVEo5aA

MEDIA: The event is free and open to the public. Media members are asked to RSVP to Len Johnson at len.johnson@cornell.edu.

 

ITHACA, N.Y. – “A sound horse” is a term used to refer to the overall health of the animal not the whinny noise it makes. A sound horse is one with no lameness, illness, or injury. Key actions to achieve and sustain equine soundness will be presented during the College of Veterinary Medicine’s Equine Seminar Series, on Tuesday, June 15 from 6 – 7 p.m. via Zoom.

 

Dr. Michelle Delco received her DVM from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2002. After completing a residency in Equine Surgery at University of California, Davis to become a board-certified surgeon, Dr. Delco served as an Assistant Professor of Equine Surgery at Kansas State University. In 2008, she joined a private equine referral practice near Seattle, WA, where her primary focus was orthopedic surgery and the diagnosis and treatment of complicated sports injuries in equine athletes. In 2012, Dr. Delco returned to Cornell University to pursue her PhD, which she completed in 2016. She is currently an Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences, and serves as a large animal surgeon at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals and Cornell Ruffian Equine Specialists in Elmont, NY. Her research focuses on understanding how joint injury leads to arthritis in horses and humans. Specifically, she is investigating mitochondria, the energy-producing centers of the cell, as a link between cartilage trauma and osteoarthritis. Her group is also interested in understanding the role of mitochondrial function in tissue repair and regenerative medicine. The goal of her research is to develop new treatment strategies to prevent irreversible joint disease and chronic pain in equine and human patients who suffer orthopedic injuries.

 

The Cornell Equine Seminar Series is presented by the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine’s Equine Hospital, the New York State 4-H Horse Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension. Held monthly, equine experts present on important equine health and management topics. The event is free and open to the public. Media members are asked to register with Len Johnson at len.johnson@cornell.edu

 

For additional information about the college, see the College of Veterinary Medicine news website.

Cornell’s Equine Seminar Series presents “Understanding the Geometry of Shoeing the Hind End”

WHAT: Steve Kraus, Certified Journeyman Farrier and Head of Cornell’s Farrier Services and training program, explains the geometrical effects of trimming and shoeing horses for improved performance and balance.

 

WHEN: Tuesday, March 23, 2021, 6 – 7 p.m.

 

WHERE: Via zoom, registration required https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/3016159960799/WN_lMtKYVASR5GsIyYFpKacjg

 

MEDIA: The event is free and open to the public. Media members are asked to RSVP to Len Johnson at len.johnson@cornell.edu.

 

ITHACA, N.Y. – There are a lot of forces at work which impact the powerful hind end of the horse. Steve Kraus will explain how proper geometry and trimming lead to improved performance during Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine’s March Equine Seminar Series, on Tuesday, March 23 from 6 – 7 p.m. via Zoom.

 

Kraus is an American Farriers Association, Certified Journeyman Farrier who has been the head of Farrier Services and a Sr. Lecturer of Large Animal Surgery, at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, and the instructor of the Farrier School there since 2010. Prior to that, he worked for over 40 years in his own farrier business in Central New York. He is known for troubleshooting lame, injured, and underperforming horses and has shod horses of practically every breed and discipline. He has lectured to farriers, veterinarians, and horse owners all over the US, Canada, South America, and Europe. He has been a featured speaker at the International Hoof Care Summit, Laminitis Conference, Equine Affaire, and the American Farriers Association Convention. Steve has written many articles published in the American Farriers Journal, The Horse Journal, and The Professional Farrier. In 2016, he was inducted into the International Farriers Hall of Fame.

 

The Cornell Equine Seminar Series is presented by the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine’s Equine Hospital, the New York State 4-H Horse Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension. Held on the second Tuesday of most months, equine experts present on important equine health and management topics. The event is free and open to the public. Media members are asked to register with Len Johnson at len.johnson@cornell.edu.

 

For additional information about the college, see the College of Veterinary Medicine news website.

 

Cornell University has dedicated television and audio studios available for media interviews supporting full HD, ISDN and web-based platforms. For additional information about the college, see the College of Veterinary Medicine news website.