Santa Anita Plans to Issue Condition Book Thursday

By Dan Ross

Santa Anita will put out a condition book April 30 which will target May 15 for the resumption of live racing under strict protocols with no fans present, according to a letter issued by track management Wednesday.

The TDN obtained a copy of the letter, which was sent to Greg Avioli, the President and CEO of the Thoroughbred Owners of California; Alan Balch, the Executive Director of California Thoroughbred Trainers; and Darrell Haire, Regional Manager of the Jockeys’ Guild.

Read TDN Article

Please follow and like us:

Churchill Backstretch to Open May 11, Fair Grounds Horses Will Be First In

By T. D. Thornton

Churchill Downs has been cleared by Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear to open its backstretch area May 11 so long as the track adheres to enhanced pandemic precautions approved by the state.

Beshear announced the clearance Wednesday at his daily COVID-19 video press conference as part of a phased-in reopening for various state industries. Churchill followed up about an hour later with a press release that included specifics pertinent to horsemen.

Neither Beshear nor the track pinpointed an exact date for the return of live racing. But the Churchill release stated “it will be staged at a minimum of four days per week,” Thursday through Sunday.

The following is a listing of racetracks and when horses based there may return to the Churchill Downs stable areas between the hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.:

  • Fair Grounds (May 11-13)
  • Gulfstream Park, Tampa Bay Downs, and horses based at Florida training centers (May 14-16)
  • Oaklawn Park (May 17-19)
  • All other locales (May 20 onward)

 

Read TDN Article

Please follow and like us:

Country Day Makes TDN’s List of Regional Value Sires for 2020

Excerpted from TDN

 

By Chris McGrath

After our exhaustive survey of Bluegrass stallions, good manners demand at least a browse through the alternatives available elsewhere in North America. But this must be a very different exercise, and a pretty unsatisfactory one too. The Kentucky market is entirely coherent, with hundreds of stallions clustered within a few miles of each other at fees to suit all budgets. Regional stallions, in contrast, serve regional mares. If you’re in Ohio, you’re not going to van a mare down to Too Much Bling (Rubiano). If you’re in Texas, equally, you don’t need telling that you can’t have too much of that guy.

Each regional market is organic, and value must be judged accordingly. Is your state program sustained by slots, for instance? Are you splitting a fee between 10 buddies from the bowling alley at a couple of hundred bucks apiece? Or are you trying to beat the Bluegrass at its own game–to breed another Chrome in California; or launch another Malibu Moon in Maryland, another Mr. Prospector in Florida?

So this is just a cursory cross-section picked from some (but by no means all) of the principal regions. They’re at various stages of their careers, at different fee tiers, and have only one thing in common: the potential–in a single, highly subjective opinion–to punch above their fees.

 

LOUISIANA

COUNTRY DAY (Speightstown–Hidden Assets, by Mt. Livermore), Peach Lane Farms, $2,500

Having been reduced to just four mares in his sixth season, last year Country Day was moved from Kentucky to make a fresh start in the Pelican State. How apt, then, that at Fair Grounds on New Year’s Day, his daughter Break Even launched her flamboyant spree of six straight wins, highlighted on Oaks day at Churchill by the GII Eight Belles S.

It had been on the equivalent card the previous year that a member of Country Day’s debut crop, Will Call, had become his first graded stakes winner. He went on to run fifth in the GI Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint–the race in which Country Day himself had enjoyed his finest hour, when second in the 2011 running. Only a few days ago, moreover, Will Call’s sister, Play On, landed her third black-type success; and their sire’s overall record now stands at 59 winners from 78 starters.

You have to look past Country Day’s relatively modest track career to account for a runner as freakish as Break Even, albeit his versatility in terms of surface was replicated when she switched to turf to run away with a Saratoga stake last summer. You very seldom see a horse clock such wild fractions with such a contained, relaxed air. The most striking thing about Country Day’s pedigree is that the bottom line so closely mirrors that of Giant’s Causeway; and, farther back, it traces to the Calumet foundation mare Blue Delight, through one of her three GI Kentucky Oaks winners. His dam, meanwhile, was a graded stakes winner who has produced four stakes scorers besides Country Day.

So it all makes sense, quite apart from the emergence of Munnings and others to advertise Speightstown as a sire of sires. Country Day, remember, produced Break Even from the most unpromising material: under the first two dams, there is otherwise a solitary black-type third at Canterbury Downs. And nor has he been a one-trick pony.

Country Day was welcomed to his new home only by a couple of dozen mares, but that surely has to change. It’s not hard, after all, to break even at this kind of money–and you might yet get a Break Even of your own.

 

 

Read Full TDN Article

Please follow and like us:

Storm the Court Named Top Juvenile Male

Storm the Court (Court Vision) has been overlooked for most of his young career thus far, but that changed with his recognition as an improbable champion 2-year-old male. Bought by horseman Bryan Rice for just $5,000 as a Fasig-Tipton February yearling in 2018, he blossomed in the ensuing year and sold for $60,000 to the shrewd Marette Farrell after breezing a quarter-mile in :21 2/5 at OBS April as the only representative of his sire in the entire sale. Scoring a 12-1 upset of his debut Aug. 10 at Del Mar, he was stepped up by trainer Peter Eurton into the GI Runhappy Del Mar Futurity next out. That race is infamous for the antics of heavy favorite Eight Rings (Empire Maker), who ducked in sharply soon after the start and unseated his rider. Storm the Court, who also lost his pilot because of the incident, was a mere footnote in the affair. He did little to make a name for himself in the GI American Pharoah S., finished a well-beaten third behind an Eight Rings that was on his best behavior Sept. 27 at Santa Anita. That led to him being dismissed at nearly 46-1 in the GI TVG Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Nov. 1 in Arcadia, but the bay kept finding more after setting a quick pace, and dug in resolutely to turn back fellow longshot Anneau d’Or (Medaglia d’Oro) by a head, pulling off the biggest stunner of the World Championship weekend. Drilling steady at his Santa Anita base, Storm the Court is slated to take his first step as a sophomore on the GI Kentucky Derby trail in the Feb. 9 GII San Vicente S.

Accepting the Award…

“I am incredibly honored to accept this award on behalf of the entire Storm the Court team. There are many people who have contributed to this colt’s special moment. Marette Farrell and her team who do all the bloodstock work for Exline-Border are some of the hardest-working people I know. They are honest, diligent and I can confidently say we would not be standing here today without their guidance. Peter Eurton did an excellent job with ‘Storm.’ Peter is an excellent horseman, but he’s like family to us. He has continuously delivered us success on the biggest of stages and we are lucky to have him on our team.” —Ryan Exline of Exline-Border Racing, co-owner

Please follow and like us:

Louisiana-bred Gives Violence Second Rising Star of the Day

9th at FG , Alw, $46000 (6f) Winner: No Parole, c, 3 by Violence

Maggi Moss’s No Parole (Violence), a 14 1/4-length debut winner here Dec. 15–good for a 90 Beyer Speed Figure–again proved too much for his Louisiana-bred foes to handle as he romped to become the third ‘TDN Rising Star’ of the day and second by Hill ‘n’ Dale’s Violence. Off at prohibitive 1-5 odds, the $75,000 KEESEP yearling seized command early in the wet going, clicked off splits of :21.79 and :44.45 and cruised home all by his lonesome with just a couple of reminders before being geared down late to canter under the line 13 1/4 lengths to the good in 1:10.24. Palvera (My Pal Charlie) was best of the rest.

The winner’s dam was a stakes-winning turf sprinter at Penn National and hails from the extended female family of graded winners License Fee (Black Tie Affair {Ire}) and Greeley’s Galaxy (Mr. Greeley). She has a short yearling filly by Connect.

 

Read TDN Article

Please follow and like us:

2YO Eclipse Contender, Storm The Court, Demonstrates the Value of his Sire, Court Vision

 

Championship Shot Brings Vision Back in Focus

Storm the Court | Eclipse Sportswire

By Chris McGrath

There’s been some pretty faint praise for the winner of what generally proves the key race to determine the best 2-year-old colt of his crop. So much so, that plenty of Eclipse voters were plainly hoping that Tiz The Law (Constitution) could pull the championship rug from under the feet of Storm The Court (Court Vision), shock winner of the GI Breeders’ Cup Juvenile, when odds-on for the GII Kentucky Jockey Club S. last Saturday.

In the event, Tiz The Law succumbed to the same stage fright that unravelled more fancied horses when Storm the Court emulated his sire, 64-1 winner of the Mile in 2011, as a hear-a-pin-drop Breeders’ Cup winner. His defeat presumably restores Storm the Court to pole position, though the turf winners at the Breeders’ Cup may yet enter the equation. But whoever ultimately gains the laurels, it must be pretty irritating for connections of Storm the Court to hear his success treated as an aberration, sooner credited to inconsistencies in track and opposition than to his own merit.

Read TDN Article

Please follow and like us:

Court Vision Colt Leads Home Parade of Longshots in Breeders’ Cup Juvenile

By Steve Sherack

ARCADIA, CA – With the crowd of 41,243 left completely stunned after a stumbling start for 4-5 favorite and ‘TDN Rising Star’ Dennis’ Moment (Tiznow), longshots Storm the Court(Court Vision) and Anneau d’Or (Medaglia d’Oro) battled down the Santa Anita stretch with the former getting the nod by a neck in a shocking GI TVG Breeders’ Cup Juvenile. Another bomb Wrecking Crew (Sky Kingdom) completed the trifecta.

The 45-1 wire-to-wire upset winner is the longest-priced victor in Breeders’ Cup Juvenile history.

 

Read TDN Story

Please follow and like us:

A Young Man, an Old Man, a Second Chance, and a Dream; Brought Together in the Form of Gemologist filly, Horologist

by Bill Finley 

Cameron Beatty was at that stage in life–young, healthy, athletic, motivated, naive–where he never even imagined the possibility that everything he had could be taken away from him. He was the starting quarterback at Freehold Township (NJ) High School and had accepted an offer to play at Fairleigh Dickinson, where he had an academic scholarship. He was going places, and on the fast track.

In an instant, everything changed.

In 2010, Beatty, now 27, was on his way to the gym to workout when he had a motorcycle accident so serious that it nearly cost him his life. He suffered a brain injury, a ruptured spleen and internal bleeding. At first, the doctors did not realize the extent of the spleen injury and the bleeding it was causing, but when his heart rate dropped to under 20 beats per minute he was rushed into emergency surgery.

“I woke up one morning bleeding to death,” he said.

It was a windy, grey morning on the backstretch at Monmouth Park as Beatty told his story. He was there not just to talk about his accident but about the horse he owns, Horologist (Gemologist). The New Jersey-bred is coming off an upset win over 2018 Eclipse Award winner Jaywalk (Cross Traffic) in the GIII Monmouth Oaks and is preparing for the biggest start of her career, the GI Cotillion S. Sept. 21 at Parx. Life is good now. He’s married, got his degree from New Jersey City University, recovered from his accident to the point where he was able to play semi-pro football and owns a valuable and talented horse.

 

Read TDN Look Article

Please follow and like us:

Randy Romero, Classy Cajun With Deft Touch and Strong Spirit, Dies at 61

By T. D. Thornton

Randy Romero, the strong-willed Louisiana jockey who parlayed “Ragin’ Cajun” fearlessness as a bush-track phenom into a Hall-of-Fame career highlighted by a gentlemanly demeanor and dramatic victories aboard championship distaffers, died the night of August 28, according to published reports. He was 61 years old.

Romero’s deft, sure-handed horsebacking skills were eclipsed only by his reputation for having rock-solid spiritual faith in the face of numerous on- and off-track adversities. For decades he courageously battled liver and kidney troubles. In mid-June of 2019 Romero disclosed that he was receiving hospice care after doctors deemed him too weak to undergo further surgeries.

 

Read TDN Article

Please follow and like us:

April Showers Bring May Flowers…And Rain Rot, Dew Poisoning and Abscesses

By Jen Roytz

They say April showers bring May flowers, but that’s not the only thing they bring. Rain rot, dew poisoning and abscesses are some of the less enjoyable products of spring’s rainy days and muddy pastures. While some horses seem to simply be more prone to wet weather-related ailments than others, there are a number of things horsemen can do to minimize the severity of ailments such as rain rot, or avoid them all together.

Though often mistaken as a fungal disease, rain rot (or rain scald) is a common bacterial infection of the skin (also known as Dermatophilosis). Dermatophilus congolensis, the bacteria that causes the infection, lives dormant in the outer layer of the skin. When the skin is exposed to prolonged moisture (high humidity, rain, sweat), the bacteria infects the compromised skin, resulting in crusty, puss-filled scabs between the living and dead layer of skin.

To Read TDN Article

Please follow and like us: