Keeneland, Fasig-Tipton And Ocala Breeders’ Sales Announce Major Reforms To Medication And Riding Crop Policies For 2-Year-Old Sales

Officials from Keeneland Association, Fasig-Tipton Company Inc. and Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company Inc. today jointly announced significant changes to policies regarding medication, including restriction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and a ban on bronchodilators at all 2-year-old sales, and limited use of riding crops at under tack shows. The revised Conditions of Sale for each sales company take effect March 2020.

These proactive measures demonstrate continued uniformity among the United States’ three largest Thoroughbred auction houses and are the latest round of leadership reforms undertaken in recent years, following action in 2009 to ban the use of anabolic steroids in sales horses and last year’s ban on the off-label use of bisphosphonates in horses younger than four years old.

Keeneland president and CEO Bill Thomason, Fasig-Tipton president Boyd T. Browning Jr. and OBS President Tom Ventura said in a joint statement: “We continue to refine and adapt our policies with the overriding goal of protecting both the human and equine athletes while providing our customers the best opportunity for success at the racetrack.”

Medication Reforms

The following changes in the medication rules will be in place for all 2-year-old sales at each of the three auction companies:

– No more than one NSAID may be administered. Stacking of NSAIDS is prohibited; and

– Bronchodilators (Clenbuterol, Albuterol and all other bronchodilators) are prohibited substances and may not be administered.

No medication may be administered 24 hours prior to a horse’s performance in an under tack show. The schedule for administration of permitted medication at Keeneland’s April 2-Year-Olds in Training Sale will be governed by the rules of racing as set forth by the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission.

Use of a Riding Crop and Spurs at an Under Tack Show

All three sales companies now prohibit the excessive use of a riding crop on the track. Under the enhanced guidelines, a rider may remove his or her hands from the reins and strike a horse once behind the girth only prior to the starting pole at which the horse begins to breeze. At any time after the start of the breeze, a rider may only use the riding crop while both hands are holding the reins and may not strike the horse behind the girth. A rider is prohibited from striking the horse in any manner beyond the finish line. In situations where the safety of the horse or rider is in jeopardy, a riding crop may be used in front of the girth. Spurs are not allowed.

Any infraction of this policy may result in a substantial fine to be paid by the consignor, and chronic offenders may be banned from riding on the sales grounds.

Please follow and like us:
error

Lifetime Breeding Right To Court Vision A Rare Sight At Keeneland January Sale

Court Vision produced the second highest win payout in Breeders’ Cup history

Not every offering at the Keeneland January Horses of All Ages Sale can be found at the end of a shank.

Friday’s closing session of the January auction will feature Hip 1671S, a lifetime breeding right to Breeders’ Cup Mile winner and veteran stallion Court Vision, who began his stud career in Ontario, relocated to Spendthrift Farm’s Kentucky base, then was moved to Acadiana Equine at Copper Crowne in Opelousas, La., for the 2017 breeding season. It’ll be the first time a stallion share, season, or breeding right has been offered at a Keeneland sale in nearly a decade.

Canadian horseman Sean Fitzhenry purchased the lifetime breeding right to Court Vision when the son of Gulch retired to Park Stud in Ontario in 2012, and he continued to support the stallion when he was moved to Kentucky in 2016. However, the breeding right had gone unused since Court Vision was sold to a group based in Louisiana and relocated to the state.

 

Read Paulick Report Article

Please follow and like us:
error

Fasig-Tipton, Keeneland Push Back Starting Dates Of November Mixed Sales

Fasig-Tipton and Keeneland have pushed back the starting dates of their respective signature November mixed sales by a day to allow more time for travel and inspection following the Breeders’ Cup, which takes place Nov. 1-2.

Fasig-Tipton has adjusted the date of its selected breeding stock sale, The November Sale, to Tuesday, Nov. 5. The sale had previously been scheduled for Nov. 4.

Keeneland announced that its 2019 November Breeding Stock Sale will begin on Wednesday, Nov. 6, at noon, and run through Sunday, Nov. 17. The November Sale was originally scheduled to begin Tuesday, Nov. 5.

 

Read Paulick Report Article

Please follow and like us:
error

Keeneland September Sale Produces Near-Record Returns, Record-Priced Filly

by

 

The 2019 renewal of the Keeneland September Yearling Sale didn’t keep up with last year’s record-setting edition when it came to the measurables. Even so, the returns from this year’s auction established a steady cruising altitude for the marketplace, showing it’s fully clear of the Great Recession that brought the Thoroughbred industry to a screeching halt a decade ago, and it proved it can still hit some of the pre-bust economy’s most dizzying heights.

A lot has changed from then to now, but two pillars remain unweathered from the glory days of the mid-2000s: The first is that horse that ticks all the proverbial boxes will bring serious money. The second is, if the horse ticks them with authority, Godolphin and the Coolmore partnership will meet in the back ring to do battle for them.

 

Read Paulick Report article

Please follow and like us:
error

Keeneland Adds Horses of Racing Age to April Sale

Addition designed to complement 2-year-olds, offer variety to buyers.

 

Keeneland has expanded the April Sale, which traditionally features only 2-year-olds in training, to include horses of racing age this year, the Lexington operation announced Jan. 30.

The April Sale is scheduled for April 9, immediately following the spring meet opening weekend that kicks off April 4. Headlining the nine stakes that weekend are the $1 million Toyota Blue Grass Stakes (G2) and $500,000 Central Bank Ashland Stakes (G1), both classic prep races.

“Keeneland’s spring meet is a convergence of horsemen heading home from their winter bases,” said Bob Elliston, Keeneland’s vice president of racing and sales. “The addition of a horses of racing age component to the April Sale complements our racing program and offers variety to buyers in town for opening weekend.”

Entry deadline for the online horses of racing age catalog is March 15, and entries for the 2-year-olds in training catalog close Feb. 1. Supplemental entries will be accepted after both deadlines.

Keeneland conducted the April 2-Year-Olds in Training Sale from 1993-2014. At the 2014 April Sale, the auction house sold 38 head for a total of $8,769,000 and an average of $230,763, including future champions Lady Eli and Roy H. The sale topper, a Malibu Moon  colt out of Tap Your Heels, the dam of Tapit , brought $1 million. The sale has been on hiatus since then.

Please follow and like us:
error

Louisiana Partners Score With Louisiana Bred Colt at Keeneland

Louisiana Partners Hit a Home Run

Perry Judice and David Meche purchased Semillon (Eskendereya), carrying her first foal by Outwork, for just $35,000 at the 2017 Keeneland November Sale and were rewarded Monday when the resulting [Louisiana-bred] colt (hip 132) sold to Chris White for $120,000.

Consigned by Select Sales, the bay colt hails from the family of GISW Cotton Blossom, GSW Vicarage and MSW Miss Atlantic City.

“We were not expecting him to bring quite that much,” said Meche, owner of Muscadine Farm. “He has really put on a lot of flesh in the last 60 days. It is night and day. He has really grown. He was ready. He looked the part and we thought getting him in the sales ring as soon as we could was best.”

Meche continued, “We like the colt because if his attitude. He is a tough colt and he has a good walk. That is what we liked the most about him.”

This is not Meche and Judice’s first rodeo when it comes to pinhooking a yearling they purchased in utero.

“We have always bought and sold and had success selling some young babies in the past,” Meche said. “We foal out, prep them and bring them here. Our goal is to buy quality mares in foal to young stallions to bring the foals back to market.”

He added, “The mare is rebred and in the regional market in Louisiana.” —@CDeBernardisTDN

Please follow and like us:
error

Trainers Exam Prep Class in Lexington, Kentucky, November 16-18, 2018

 

Subject: Trainers Exam Prep Class in Lexington, Kentucky 

Dates: November 16-18, 2018 

Location: Keeneland Kitchen conference room 

Lexington, Kentucky 

Registration fee: $299 by November 9; $349 after 

Contact: C. Reid McLellan, PhD 859-321-4377

The Groom Elite Program and Purple Power Equine Services are sponsoring a Trainers’ Exam Prep Class at Keeneland’s Track Kitchen Conference Room in Lexington, KY Friday through Sunday November 16-19. Instructor C. Reid McLellan, PhD, Executive Director of the nationally recognized Groom Elite Program since 2005, participated on the Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse’s committee that wrote a standardized National Trainers’ Exam. McLellan has been teaching rules of racing to prospective trainers since 1985 and is continually updating the materials used in this class. 

Each racing jurisdiction has it’s on rule book and a trainer must be aware of those differences when sending horses across jurisdiction lines. Owners take this class to become more aware of the rules under which their trainer is working. Experienced grooms and shedrow foremen desiring to become assistant trainers benefit from this prep class. Even handicappers have taken this class to more completely understand the game as they seek an edge over their competition. 

First day is devoted to terminology, definitions and information that is included on the barn test. The final day is devoted to racing activity including, rules for first time starters, claiming rules (that are changing steadily) and entering horses including an understanding how to determine correct weight to be carried by a horse being entered. Rules differ from state to state and McLellan discusses those important differences. In between, administrative rules are highlighted by a veterinary session on Day 2 that stimulates lively discussion. 

Registration fee is $299 if paid by November 9, $349 after if space is available. Class size is limited to 10 so early registration is recommended. (The June 2017 Lexington class sold out.) 

For more information and to register for this Trainers’ Exam Prep Class, go to www.purplepowerracing.com Dr. McLellan is available by cell phone at 859-321-4377, twitter @creidmac or email creidmac@gmail.com 

Please follow and like us:
error

Keeneland Bans ‘Indian Charlie’ Newsletter From Grounds

Keeneland officials have notified Ed Musselman not to distribute newsletter

Keeneland officials have notified Ed Musselman, creator of the popular “Indian Charlie” newsletter, that the one-sheet humorous bulletins he writes and distributes are not welcome on Keeneland’s grounds.

Musselman received a letter Oct. 1 that was dated Sept. 20, 2018, from Keeneland director of security Phillip E. Gardner, and signed by Gardner, Keeneland president and CEO Bill Thomason, and Keeneland vice president and chief operating officer Vince Gabbert informing him the newsletter, which  is distributed during race meets and sales, “is not allowed to be distributed, by any fashion, on Keeneland grounds … indefinitely.”

The ban includes Keeneland’s main grounds, the Rice Road training center, Red Mile Horse Racing Center, the Thoroughbred Club, and the Thoroughbred Training Center, all owned and/or operated and maintained by Keeneland management.

Gardner states that any failure to follow Keeneland’s request will result in a formal ejection notice being served to Mussleman and any of his employees.

“Once a formal ejection notice is served, and subsequently violated,” said the letter, “the Lexington Police Department will be asked to intervene, and Keeneland management will pursue criminal procedures against all ejected parties as applicable.”

The “Indian Charlie” newsletter and Musselman himself had been ruled off Churchill Downs in 2014 after a controversy arose over a piece Musselman wrote about backstretch workers. Keeneland honored that ban, according to Bob Elliston, Keeneland’s vice president of racing and sales. Eventually, Churchill Downs relented and Keeneland followed suit, but, according to Elliston, Keeneland made the stipulation that Musselman not distribute the newsletter on its grounds.

“When our director of security observed Musselman distributing the newsletter during the recent September sale,” said Elliston, “he was reminded not to do so.”

Musselman maintains that Keeneland officials have known for the past several years that he has been distributing “Indian Charlie” around the Lexington track, and that the newsletter has been available in the track kitchen, racing office, and barn area.

“Keeneland officials are reacting to specific recent articles in the newsletter,” Musselman said. “Keeneland is a great place and I can’t knock it. I respect its private property rights and I will go paperless for any editions that come out during Keeneland events.”

Musselman, who has been producing the “Indian Charlie” sheets since 1994, said the next “Indian Charlie” newsletters are scheduled for Oct. 21-23 around the Fasig-Tipton October Sale.

Please follow and like us:
error

Record Average Sale Price Highlights Strong Keeneland September Renewal

by | 09.23.2018

 

There was plenty to be excited about in advance of this year’s Keeneland September Yearling Sale, but it was the surprises that helped propel the bellwether auction from a strong edition into the kind not seen since the economic crash of the mid-2000s.

A combination of factors – from a favorable economic climate, to the first crop from a Triple Crown winner, to a somewhat unexpected appearance from Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum of the Godolphin operation – came together to produce one of the strongest renewals of the Keeneland September sale in its history. At the end of 13 sessions, the auction finished with a record average sale price, the second-highest all-time median price, and the fourth-highest gross.

A total of 2,916 yearlings changed hands at this year’s sale for $377,130,400, up 23 percent from last year’s 12-day auction, when 2,555 horses brought $307,845,400. The gross surpassed last year’s final total during the seventh session, and it finished as the highest since 2007, the last full sale before the market crash, when 5,553 horses sold for $385,018,600.

The average sale price settled at a record $129,331, up seven percent from $120,487 in 2017, and surpassing the previous record of $112,427 set in 2006. The median was down 12 percent to $50,000 from a record $57,000, but it entered a four-way tie for the second-highest ever, joining a three-sale run from 2013 to 2015. The final buyback rate of 24 percent marked a small improvement from 25 percent last year.

At the top of the market, 27 horses sold for seven figures, more than the last two Keeneland September sales combined, and the most since 2007. It was the fifth-most horses sold for $1 million or more in the sale’s history.

“I think the gross is so high because the top end is as strong as it’s ever been,” said consignor Scott Mallory. “You start adding million-dollar horses on there, it gets the gross up pretty quick. I think there’s a shortage of good horses. I hear trainers tell us all the time there’s a shortage of good horses.”

While there are plenty of pieces that go into making a sale of this caliber, Keeneland’s director of sales operations Geoffrey Russell said none of the figures would have been possible if the quality of horseflesh in the ring did not match the demand.

“It has to be the horse, and this is what we come back to,” Russell said. “This is a very good crop of horses. Yes, all the other external factors of depreciation, new tax laws, stock market, all the other factors, have helped raise the bar, but If those horses aren’t top quality, they’re not going to give you extra money just because they have it in their pockets. The credit goes to the breeders and consignors that have had an exceptional crop this year.”

Suzi Shoemaker of Lantern Hill Farm put more stock in the economy’s effect on buyer activity – particularly the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, which dramatically increased the tax benefits for yearling buyers. However, Shoemaker also noted that the sport’s efforts to shine up its image could be slowly reaching the people with money to spend.

“I think the tax cuts have had a huge effect on everyone’s emotional landscape,” she said. “People just feel like they can have some fun with their money. A lot of these people have corporations or big businesses and I feel like they can use their cash for more discretionary items like racehorses.

“We’ve made a lot of progress in our industry with bringing people in, and taking care of our racehorses when their careers are over,” Shoemaker continued. “Drugs are still a problem, but I think it’s being addressed. My feeling is we’re moving forward on these things. Yes, I know we still have a lot of problems, but I think we’re addressing them and we’ve got a solid core of people. We may or may not be growing it, but we’re keeping who we’ve got.”

Sheikh Mohammed Ups The Ante

The story of the 2018 Keeneland September sale, and especially its select Book 1, cannot be told without making reference to the presence of Sheikh Mohammed, who appeared at the sale in person for the first time in several years.

With the head of the operation in attendance, Godolphin more than doubled its spending at the September sale, going from 17 purchases totaling $8,065,000 last year to 27 yearlings for $19,960,000. It was the biggest performance by a single buying entity since 2006, when Godolphin landed 34 horses for $59,945,000 including the $11.7-million Meydan City, whose sale price is still the highest ever for a yearling at auction.

The operation of Sheikh Mohammed signed tickets under the name of both Godolphin and Godolphin Japan, shoehorning certain horses for his Asian interests.

Sheikh Mohammed’s arrival was a welcome surprise for the Keeneland staff. The ruler of Dubai also spent time looking over his horses at his U.S. base of operations at the former Jonabell Farm in Lexington, Ky., and he left the sale to attend the World Equestrian Games in Tryon, N.C.

“You never know,” said Bob Elliston, Keeneland’s vice president of racing and sales. “ Every year, we hope, and every year I think there’s probably hope on their end that he’s coming as well, but things get in the way. As soon as we see that big plane with that flag on the tail, we know then.”

While Sheikh Mohammed was gone by the sale’s traditional “dark day” on the first Friday of selling, Airdrie Stud general manager Ben Henley speculated that his strong buying had a ripple effect on the sessions that followed.

“People are getting outbid on those horses early and getting pushed back a book,” Henley said. “It kind of keeps happing all way down and it’s a domino effect on the whole marketplace.”

With the figures reaching heights not seen since the mid-2000s, Sheikh Mohammed’s presence also brought with it the return of the classic bidding slugfests between Godolphin and the Coolmore partnership. Though the prices did not reach the delirious heights they did in the previous decade, the competition was fierce between the two entities.

Godolphin accounted for seven of the auction’s million-dollar horses, while Coolmore took home a trio of seven-figure yearlings, including the sale-topper.

Coolmore’s reverence to Claiborne Farm sire War Front continued to be on display at the September sale when it landed Hip 458, a $2.4-million colt out of the Grade 1-winning Smart Strike mare Streaming. The colt’s third dam is Broodmare of the Year Better Than Honour, putting him in the family of champion Rags to Riches, Belmont Stakes winner Jazil, and Breeders’ Cup Marathon winner Man of Iron, among others.

Hill ‘n’ Dale Sales Agency consigned the colt, as agent.

New Catalog Format Draws Mixed Reviews

For the third straight year, the Keeneland September sale introduced a new format for the first week of its sale. After last year’s renewal started with a single ultra-select Book 1 and finished the week with three sessions of Book 2, the 2018 edition expanded Book 1 into four sessions and pushed Book 2 into the weekend.

Elliston said the quality of this year’s total catalog had a strong influence in blowing out the first book. Horses were spread out to nearly every barn from one to 49 on the Keeneland backstretch for Book 1, which was designed to give each horse space to properly show themselves without being too crowded.

Any logistical issues that might have stemmed from the spread-out nature of the Book 1 horses were inadvertently quelled when washout rains on the Sunday before the opening session led Keeneland officials to delay the start times for all four Book 1 sessions by two hours, giving prospective buyers an extra eight hours to inspect the horses.

“Every year, the inspection team looks at the depth of the crop that’s there, and we tailor it to that,” Elliston said. “People make a lot of the format, but really, we’re the only ones that have to deal with format because we’re the only people that sell the numbers that we do. That’s a responsibility that we take very seriously, to create an environment conducive to buyers and sellers getting the most they can.”

While the high returns are hard to deny, expanding the Book 1 offerings did create a tough draw for some horses that might have been placed in Book 2 in prior catalog configurations. Instead of benefitting from a “big fish, small pond” effect, some sellers were concerned their horses at the level below the very elite might have gotten lost in the shuffle while more suitable buyers waited until the later sessions to arrive at the ale.

“It’s going to be hard for them to adjust the format when the sale’s been so high, but it’s been kind of tough on the consignments,” Mallory said. “I had some in Book 1 where I sold horses in Book 2 that weren’t nearly as good for a lot more money just because of the way the format was. They’ll work it out, though. It’s hard to please everybody, and when you’re trying to get 4,500 head through the sale, you’re not going to get everything where it needs to be.”

The first week of the sale might have had some placement casualties, but sellers were generally pleased with how their slots shook out in the middle sessions. Shopping activity, both in terms of inspecting horses and buying them, remained robust well into the later books.

“Most of these horses that we have here, the consignors are so on top of it, on top of knowing what we have and where they belong,” said Carrie Brogden of Select Sales. “Placement is incredible to me. Too far early can really hurt you, but too far back, they can still find you.”

Uncle Mo, War Front, American Pharoah Drive Sire Power

Uncle Mo, a resident of Ashford Stud, led all sires by gross for the first time, with 65 yearlings sold for $22,392,000. It was the highest gross produced by a sire at a Keeneland September sale since Storm Cat put 24 through the ring for $30,485,000 in 2006.

The top sire by average sale price was War Front, whose 18 horses sold brought an average of $782,500. It was War Front’s second time leading the sale, after achieving the same feat in 2015.

War Front finished tied with Darley‘s Medaglia d’Oro for the most seven-figure horses, each with five.

As expected, the auction was a coming out party for Triple Crown winner American Pharoah, whose first yearlings had a big impact on the final figures. In total, the member of the Ashford Stud roster had 47 yearlings sell for a combined $19,585,000 (third-highest) and an average of $416,702 (fifth-highest among those with three or more sold).

American Pharoah finished with three horses past the seven-figure mark, led by the auction’s second-highest price, Hip 91, a $2.2-million colt out of the Grade 2-placed stakes-winning Indian Charlie mare Kindle, who sold to the Godolphin operation. Woods Edge Farm consigned the colt, as agent.

To view the sale’s full results, click here.

Please follow and like us:
error

Keeneland 2019 April Two-Year-Olds In Training Sale Set For April 9

Keeneland officials announced September 14, 2018, that the 2019 April Two-Year-Olds in Training Sale will be held Tuesday, April 9. The Preview Day, which will offer breezes over both the main dirt track and turf course, will be held Monday, April 8.

“Keeneland looks forward to the return of the April Sale, and we anticipate we will see several 2018 September Yearling Sale graduates participating,” Keeneland Vice President of Racing and Sales Bob Elliston said.

“The April Sale affords horsemen several unique advantages,” Elliston said. “One is the opportunity to present a consignment before a number of prominent owners and trainers at Keeneland for opening weekend of the Spring Meet, which begins April 5, and includes the Toyota Blue Grass. Another is the chance to breeze your juvenile over Keeneland’s dirt track and turf course, two of the best racing surfaces in the country.”

Keeneland conducted its April Two-Year-Olds in Training Sale from 1993-2014. The sale has been on hiatus since 2015.

The April Sale has a proven record of success, having produced 2017 champions Lady Eli and Roy H in its final edition in 2014. The auction counts six classic winners among its graduates: Belmont (G1) winner Palace Malice; Preakness (G1) winner and champion Lookin At Lucky; Kentucky Derby (G1) and Preakness winner and champion Big Brown; Kentucky Derby and Belmont winner and champion Thunder Gulch; and Kentucky Oaks (G1) winners Keeper Hill and Gal in a Ruckus. Champion Beautiful Pleasure also is an April sale graduate.

Please follow and like us:
error