POW! Apprentice Jockey Ramirez Makes Remarkable Recovery At Delta Downs

Paulina Ramirez nearly falls off St Teresa

Apprentice jockey Paulina Ramirez was cruising on the front end in a juvenile maiden claimer Wednesday evening at Delta Downs, when disaster nearly struck. Her mount, St Teresa, seemed to duck and hit the rail, flipping Ramirez off the side of the horse.

Ramirez, whose nickname is Pow!, somehow managed to hang on and lift herself back over St Teresa. While the rider had to give up her winning position, she still managed to finish third.

 

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Kentucky Commission Unanimously Approves Sale Of Turfway To Churchill

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A rendering of the planned grandstand for Turfway Park.

At a special meeting convened Tuesday afternoon, the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission voted unanimously to approve the change of control for Turfway Park, clearing the way for Churchill Downs Inc. (CDI) to purchase the track for $46 million. Churchill, operating via its wholly-owned subsidiary, NKYRG LLC, announced the deal last week, noting it was contingent upon Commission approval. The closing is expected to take place tomorrow.

Kevin Flannery, president of Churchill Downs Race Track, presented the commission with CDI’s initial plans for the facility. CDI plans to hold the upcoming race meet, which runs December to March, and demolish the existing grandstand and associated buildings immediately after. Flannery said simulcasting will be moved to another, to-be-determined location during construction. CDI plans to operate during the same December to March timeframe next season, with the hope being that the majority of the construction will be completed by the end of 2020. The official grand opening for the new facility is slated sometime mid-2021.

 

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Fasig-Tipton, Keeneland Push Back Starting Dates Of November Mixed Sales

Fasig-Tipton and Keeneland have pushed back the starting dates of their respective signature November mixed sales by a day to allow more time for travel and inspection following the Breeders’ Cup, which takes place Nov. 1-2.

Fasig-Tipton has adjusted the date of its selected breeding stock sale, The November Sale, to Tuesday, Nov. 5. The sale had previously been scheduled for Nov. 4.

Keeneland announced that its 2019 November Breeding Stock Sale will begin on Wednesday, Nov. 6, at noon, and run through Sunday, Nov. 17. The November Sale was originally scheduled to begin Tuesday, Nov. 5.

 

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Keeneland September Sale Produces Near-Record Returns, Record-Priced Filly

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The 2019 renewal of the Keeneland September Yearling Sale didn’t keep up with last year’s record-setting edition when it came to the measurables. Even so, the returns from this year’s auction established a steady cruising altitude for the marketplace, showing it’s fully clear of the Great Recession that brought the Thoroughbred industry to a screeching halt a decade ago, and it proved it can still hit some of the pre-bust economy’s most dizzying heights.

A lot has changed from then to now, but two pillars remain unweathered from the glory days of the mid-2000s: The first is that horse that ticks all the proverbial boxes will bring serious money. The second is, if the horse ticks them with authority, Godolphin and the Coolmore partnership will meet in the back ring to do battle for them.

 

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Ask Your Insurer: When And Why To Change A Horse’s Insured Value

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Equine insurance experts answer your questions about insuring Thoroughbreds for the breeding and auction realms. Email us at info@paulickreport. com if you have a question for an insurer.

QUESTION: When should I consider increasing or decreasing the insured value of my horse, and how do I do it?

BRYCE BURTON: There are various reasons that a policyholder would want to amend the insured value of their horse, which is done in order to accurately cover the horse for its true value.

For a racer, the owner would want to increase the value if the horse has won a race that inherently increases the value of that horse, or even if the owner has received an offer for the horse, which is higher than what that owner currently has the horse insured for. The same goes for decreasing the value of an insured horse, which would normally be done if the horse is dropping in class, for instance, from an allowance race into the claiming ranks.

With respect to broodmares and foals, an event within the family could spark the need for an increase. For example, if the first foal out of an insured mare were to win a big stakes race, it may be worth looking into increasing both her insured value and potentially any of her promising foals.

Depending on the size of the increase, either a veterinary certificate or a declaration of health, which can be completed by the owner, will need to be completed on the horse. Once approved by the company, the increase or decrease in value will be calculated on a pro-rata basis. This means that you will only be charged for your time on risk for the increase. So, if the increase is put into effect six months into the policy period, you will only pay for that increase for the remaining six months.

QUESTION: Can the Full Mortality Rates provided by the company be changed in the middle of a policy-term?

BRYCE BURTON: Yes. If the insured horse’s use is changed in the middle of the policy period, the rate will be changed respectively. The most common example of this that we see is when a horse is retired from racing. If it’s a filly and she is taken off the track to be bred, we would decrease her Full Mortality Rate mid-policy term and the insured would receive a return premium, or credit, for the remaining time on risk. The same would be true if a gelding were retired from racing and re-trained for another discipline.

Bryce Burton is a property and liability specialist for Muirfield Insurance. He is from Frankfort, Ky., where he grew up an avid race fan. His Thoroughbred racing fandom combined with a collegiate internship in the insurance industry, culminated in a start in the equine insurance field. Bryce has been with Muirfield Insurance since 2014, following his graduation from Transylvania University in Lexington

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Tips To Recognizing Legitimate Horse Rescues

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In June, 159 horses were seized from Scarlet’s Legacy Equine Rescue in Camp County, Texas. A 501(c)(3), the organization, based on 45 acres, was managed by Deanna Tierney. Local media covered the seizure extensively, and Horse Nation reported on how horse lovers can help horses in need, like those who were taken from Scarlet’s Legacy, and how to prevent similar future situations. Currently, the horses in Safe Haven’s care need feed, hay and hay bags; their Amazon Smile wishlist includes other items the organization needs.

To prevent future cases like this one, Horse Nation reports that Jessica Johnson, Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) Animal Crimes Director, encourages people who are considering working with or adopting from a rescue visit the organization in person if the entity is local.

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Hall Of Fame Jockey Randy Romero In Hospice Care

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Hall of Fame jockey Randy Romero

Jockey Randy Romero, elected to racing’s Hall of Fame in 2010, said last weekend he is hospice care but is at home in Lafayette, La., where a brother is staying with him and helping with his care.

“I’m very sick but I haven’t given up,” he said by phone. Romero, 62, said doctors told him he is not strong enough to undergo the surgery necessary to remove tumors that were discovered in 2015. He said his pain is being managed and hospice is allowing him to undergo dialysis three times weekly at a facility close to his home, a procedure he has done for some 15 years.

 

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Texas Horse Racing To Get Purse Boost From New Law Diverting Sales Tax On Horse Products

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As much as $17.5 million per year could be used to support Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse purses in Texas as a result of legislation signed into law last weekend by Gov. Greg Abbott.

House Bill 2463 diverts sales taxes on horse feed, tack and other horse-related products and services from the state’s general fund to an escrow account established by the Texas Racing Commission and capped at $25 million annually. No more than 70% of the funds in the escrow account may go toward purses. If the escrow account reaches $25 million, that would be an additional $17.5 million in purse money annually, virtually doubling the current amount, based on an economic study conducted by TXP Inc. consultants.

 

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Cast Horses: What To Do (And What Not To Do) To Help

by | 06.13.2019 | 12:21pm

This horse is not cast, but is getting up after lying down, demonstrating the way horses need to push their front legs out to get their balance when rising.

Horsemen probably don’t comprehend how big and heavy a horse actually is until it gets cast against or under something and they have to get it unstuck. One futile tug on the mane of a cast horse and the person quickly will realize he or she needs assistance.

“The first thing I would say is to get some help,” said Dr. Sally DeNotta, extension specialist and assistant professor of large animal internal medicine at the University of Florida. “You don’t want to be in the stall with a cast horse alone because it’s dangerous and they’re big.”

 

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Breeders’ Cup Presents Connections: Chasing A Louisiana ‘Wild Card’

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Kevin Atwood with Ours to Run

Kevin Atwood has always liked speed. His boots were in stirrups more often than on the ground while he was growing up in Hopkinsville, Ky., and he carried on that tradition with barrel racing through adulthood.

In 2008, however, Atwood had to admit he needed to slow down. Then 46, he started searching for another outlet in which he could enjoy both horses and speed. Turning to Thoroughbred racing, Atwood contacted his childhood friend, fellow Hopkinsville native trainer Larry Jones. His first horse, named One Pretty Lady, won a couple races and earned more than double her purchase price, and Atwood was hooked.

 

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