Lifetime Breeding Right To Court Vision A Rare Sight At Keeneland January Sale

Court Vision produced the second highest win payout in Breeders’ Cup history

Not every offering at the Keeneland January Horses of All Ages Sale can be found at the end of a shank.

Friday’s closing session of the January auction will feature Hip 1671S, a lifetime breeding right to Breeders’ Cup Mile winner and veteran stallion Court Vision, who began his stud career in Ontario, relocated to Spendthrift Farm’s Kentucky base, then was moved to Acadiana Equine at Copper Crowne in Opelousas, La., for the 2017 breeding season. It’ll be the first time a stallion share, season, or breeding right has been offered at a Keeneland sale in nearly a decade.

Canadian horseman Sean Fitzhenry purchased the lifetime breeding right to Court Vision when the son of Gulch retired to Park Stud in Ontario in 2012, and he continued to support the stallion when he was moved to Kentucky in 2016. However, the breeding right had gone unused since Court Vision was sold to a group based in Louisiana and relocated to the state.

 

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Can Horses Be Sleep Deprived?

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Sleep is vitally important to horses, but equines don’t require the eight consecutive hours many humans need to be healthy and rested. Instead, the average horse will spend just under three hours per day asleep; this sleep will be spaced out throughout the entire 24-hour time period. It’s rare for an adult horse to spend over 10 minutes asleep at any one time. This means that a horse sleeps between 15 and 21 times a day.

Horses can sleep standing up using a “stay apparatus” that effectively locks their legs in place using a group of ligaments, tendons and muscles. As horses are prey animals, using this mechanism allows the horse to move quickly if any predators are around. Generally, a horse that is resting on three legs is dozing and not actively asleep. When standing, horses tend to keep one or both eyes open, even while dozing. This also allows him to react quickly should a predator threaten.

 

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Grazing Cattle With Horses Can Help Control Worms, Study Finds

by | 11.30.2019

Grazing horses and cattle together has long been suggested as a tool for helping control strongyle worms, but little research has been done to prove its efficacy. The majority of gastrointestinal parasites are host specific, meaning that the infective stages of equine worms ingested by cattle won’t develop into adults; the same is true for cattle worms ingested by horses.

In addition, horses and cattle graze differently; horses graze close to the ground and avoid areas where there is manure. Cattle can’t graze as close to the ground as horses and will graze areas that horses avoid.

A new study out of France used 44 breeding farms in two different regions of the country to test the benefits of grazing both species together. The farms raised both sport horses and pleasure horses; some were equine-only farms and others grazed cattle with their horses.

Researchers used surveys and interviews to determine stocking rate, the amount of pasture used for grazing and how much deworming products were used, as well as general pasture management. They found the following:

  • Few farmers understood that grazing horses and cattle together could be part of their deworming protocol
  • Many farms still rely on fenbendazole though resistance to the drug is well known
  • Young horses treated with moxidectin and grazed with cattle had 50 percent fewer stronglye eggs in their feces then their counterparts that were grazed in horse-only pastures

The study concluded that grazing horses with cattle is a promising alternative to controlling worms that is largely unused by horse farm owners.

Read more at Equine Science Update

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Former Jockey Sellers Still ‘In The Game’ With New Farm Role

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Shane Sellers at Keeneland, 1996

Former jockey Shane Sellers’ daily routine is far different than his previous lifestyle, yet he’s only 15 miles from Keeneland where he had some of his most successful moments on the track.

In a career that closed in 2013 after 30 years, counting a five-year premature retirement, Sellers won 4,393 races. His mounts, including Hall of Famer Skip Away, earned more than $130 million. Since his final race, Sellers has found his stride in farm life. He is content in his role as a key crew member at Safari North, the former Pauls Mill that was purchased in 2018 by his girlfriend, Susan Moulton. The picturesque facility has mares, foals, yearlings and racetrack lay-ups for a total of about 50 horses. The property also houses a few retired racers that Sellers and Moulton ride.

 

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POW! Apprentice Jockey Ramirez Makes Remarkable Recovery At Delta Downs

Paulina Ramirez nearly falls off St Teresa

Apprentice jockey Paulina Ramirez was cruising on the front end in a juvenile maiden claimer Wednesday evening at Delta Downs, when disaster nearly struck. Her mount, St Teresa, seemed to duck and hit the rail, flipping Ramirez off the side of the horse.

Ramirez, whose nickname is Pow!, somehow managed to hang on and lift herself back over St Teresa. While the rider had to give up her winning position, she still managed to finish third.

 

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Kentucky Commission Unanimously Approves Sale Of Turfway To Churchill

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A rendering of the planned grandstand for Turfway Park.

At a special meeting convened Tuesday afternoon, the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission voted unanimously to approve the change of control for Turfway Park, clearing the way for Churchill Downs Inc. (CDI) to purchase the track for $46 million. Churchill, operating via its wholly-owned subsidiary, NKYRG LLC, announced the deal last week, noting it was contingent upon Commission approval. The closing is expected to take place tomorrow.

Kevin Flannery, president of Churchill Downs Race Track, presented the commission with CDI’s initial plans for the facility. CDI plans to hold the upcoming race meet, which runs December to March, and demolish the existing grandstand and associated buildings immediately after. Flannery said simulcasting will be moved to another, to-be-determined location during construction. CDI plans to operate during the same December to March timeframe next season, with the hope being that the majority of the construction will be completed by the end of 2020. The official grand opening for the new facility is slated sometime mid-2021.

 

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Fasig-Tipton, Keeneland Push Back Starting Dates Of November Mixed Sales

Fasig-Tipton and Keeneland have pushed back the starting dates of their respective signature November mixed sales by a day to allow more time for travel and inspection following the Breeders’ Cup, which takes place Nov. 1-2.

Fasig-Tipton has adjusted the date of its selected breeding stock sale, The November Sale, to Tuesday, Nov. 5. The sale had previously been scheduled for Nov. 4.

Keeneland announced that its 2019 November Breeding Stock Sale will begin on Wednesday, Nov. 6, at noon, and run through Sunday, Nov. 17. The November Sale was originally scheduled to begin Tuesday, Nov. 5.

 

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Keeneland September Sale Produces Near-Record Returns, Record-Priced Filly

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The 2019 renewal of the Keeneland September Yearling Sale didn’t keep up with last year’s record-setting edition when it came to the measurables. Even so, the returns from this year’s auction established a steady cruising altitude for the marketplace, showing it’s fully clear of the Great Recession that brought the Thoroughbred industry to a screeching halt a decade ago, and it proved it can still hit some of the pre-bust economy’s most dizzying heights.

A lot has changed from then to now, but two pillars remain unweathered from the glory days of the mid-2000s: The first is that horse that ticks all the proverbial boxes will bring serious money. The second is, if the horse ticks them with authority, Godolphin and the Coolmore partnership will meet in the back ring to do battle for them.

 

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Ask Your Insurer: When And Why To Change A Horse’s Insured Value

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Equine insurance experts answer your questions about insuring Thoroughbreds for the breeding and auction realms. Email us at info@paulickreport. com if you have a question for an insurer.

QUESTION: When should I consider increasing or decreasing the insured value of my horse, and how do I do it?

BRYCE BURTON: There are various reasons that a policyholder would want to amend the insured value of their horse, which is done in order to accurately cover the horse for its true value.

For a racer, the owner would want to increase the value if the horse has won a race that inherently increases the value of that horse, or even if the owner has received an offer for the horse, which is higher than what that owner currently has the horse insured for. The same goes for decreasing the value of an insured horse, which would normally be done if the horse is dropping in class, for instance, from an allowance race into the claiming ranks.

With respect to broodmares and foals, an event within the family could spark the need for an increase. For example, if the first foal out of an insured mare were to win a big stakes race, it may be worth looking into increasing both her insured value and potentially any of her promising foals.

Depending on the size of the increase, either a veterinary certificate or a declaration of health, which can be completed by the owner, will need to be completed on the horse. Once approved by the company, the increase or decrease in value will be calculated on a pro-rata basis. This means that you will only be charged for your time on risk for the increase. So, if the increase is put into effect six months into the policy period, you will only pay for that increase for the remaining six months.

QUESTION: Can the Full Mortality Rates provided by the company be changed in the middle of a policy-term?

BRYCE BURTON: Yes. If the insured horse’s use is changed in the middle of the policy period, the rate will be changed respectively. The most common example of this that we see is when a horse is retired from racing. If it’s a filly and she is taken off the track to be bred, we would decrease her Full Mortality Rate mid-policy term and the insured would receive a return premium, or credit, for the remaining time on risk. The same would be true if a gelding were retired from racing and re-trained for another discipline.

Bryce Burton is a property and liability specialist for Muirfield Insurance. He is from Frankfort, Ky., where he grew up an avid race fan. His Thoroughbred racing fandom combined with a collegiate internship in the insurance industry, culminated in a start in the equine insurance field. Bryce has been with Muirfield Insurance since 2014, following his graduation from Transylvania University in Lexington

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Tips To Recognizing Legitimate Horse Rescues

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In June, 159 horses were seized from Scarlet’s Legacy Equine Rescue in Camp County, Texas. A 501(c)(3), the organization, based on 45 acres, was managed by Deanna Tierney. Local media covered the seizure extensively, and Horse Nation reported on how horse lovers can help horses in need, like those who were taken from Scarlet’s Legacy, and how to prevent similar future situations. Currently, the horses in Safe Haven’s care need feed, hay and hay bags; their Amazon Smile wishlist includes other items the organization needs.

To prevent future cases like this one, Horse Nation reports that Jessica Johnson, Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) Animal Crimes Director, encourages people who are considering working with or adopting from a rescue visit the organization in person if the entity is local.

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