Louisiana Officials Revoke Ownership License Of Former Co-Defendant In Zetas Money Laundering Case

by Natalie Voss

 

Louisiana stewards have revoked the ownership license of Carlos M. Nayen-Barbolla after determining Nayen-Barbolla – one of the men convicted as part of the Zetas drug cartel’s drug laundering case – lied on his application.

According to a ruling dated Oct. 21, Nayen-Barbolla was affiliated with the ownership group Red Sea Racing and applied for an owner’s license on July 20.

“When filling out his application he answered ‘no’ to Question 1 Have you ever used an alias or been licensed under any other name? and Question 6 Have you or your spouse ever been arrested or charged with any misdemeanor or felony, including DWI?’” the ruling read.

 

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New Study Finds Horses Racing On Lasix At 62 Percent Increased Risk Of Sudden Death

by Paulick Report Staff

 

A new study of data from the Equine Injury Database has revealed that horses medicated with furosemide (Lasix) on race day were at 62 percent increased odds of sudden death compared to horses that were not racing on furosemide.

Funded by the Grayson Jockey Club Foundation, the study was published by Dr. Euan Bennet and Dr. Tim Parkin on Oct. 20, 2022, in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. It examined the 4,198,073 race starts made by 284,387 Thoroughbred horses at 144 racetracks in the United States and Canada between 2009 and 2021; those numbers represent 92.2 percent of all official race starts during that period.

Of those nearly 4.2 million starts, 536 resulted in a horse’s sudden death, an incidence rate of 0.13/1,000 starts. Sudden death was defined as any horse that was recorded as a fatality within three days of racing, along with one or more of the following fatal injury descriptions or (presumptive) diagnosis, as provided by each participating track to the EID: (1) sudden death (recorded as “SUD” in the EID), (2) pulmonary hemorrhage, (3) exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), (4) postexertional distress/heatstroke (PED), and (5) cardiac arrhythmia.

 

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Lasix Mythbusters: Drug Masking, TCO2, And Impact On Racehorse Breakdowns

by Natalie Voss

 

For decades now, people with an interest in horse racing have had opinions about furosemide, commonly referred to by its trade name of Lasix or Salix. Even now, as its use has been gradually pushed back farther from race time, theories abound on why trainers use it, and how (or whether) it should be used.

But floating about amongst all those opinions are sometimes misconceptions, including one we’ve heard repeatedly at the Paulick Report – that furosemide is used as a masking agent to cover up illegal drug use in post-race testing.

Dr. Rick Sams, former laboratory director at LGC Science, said that under current regulations, that just isn’t possible. Here’s why.

 

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Judge Rules CDI Can Ban Broberg From Fair Grounds Over Alleged Neglect

by Paulick Report Staff

 

Trainer Karl Broberg

Last September, Churchill Downs, Inc. banned trainer Karl Broberg from the entry box at its parent company’s racetracks after an incident involving a voided claim led to what CDI alleged as neglect.

When racing began at the CDI-owned Fair Grounds Race Course in New Orleans, La., however, the Louisiana Racing Commission insisted that only state racing stewards could legally exclude Broberg from racing. Commission chair Benjamin Guilbeau argued that since the Kentucky commission did not take action against Broberg, the trainer’s license remained in good standing.

Broberg wound up starting 40 horses at last year’s Fair Grounds race meet, per Equibase, running out earnings of $152,900. For comparison, the trainer started 76 horses at the 2020-2021 race meet.

 

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Fourteen HBPA Affiliates, Four Tracks Seek To Join HISA Lawsuit

by Paulick Report Staff

 

An alliance of 14 affiliates of the Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association and four racetracks are seeking protection from the alleged harms of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act Authority (HISA). They are asking a federal judge to allow them to participate in an existing lawsuit that claims HISA and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) violated the Fourth and Seventh Amendments to the U.S. Constitution as well as the process by which federal agencies develop and issue regulations, T. D. Thornton of Thoroughbred Daily News reports.

The HBPA affiliates and the tracks on Friday filed a “motion to intervene” in United States District Court (Western District of Louisiana). If accepted by the judge, it would grant the petitioners status in the case alongside the lead plaintiffs from the states of Louisiana and West Virginia.

The HBPA affiliates seeking to join the lawsuit are Arizona, Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Washington, Charles Town, and Tampa Bay Downs. The Colorado Horse Racing Association, the state’s statutorily recognized horsemen’s group, also wants to be an intervenor.

 

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Court Of Appeals Issues Temporary Stay, Lifting Injunction Against HISA In Louisiana, West Virginia

by Paulick Report Staff

 

The United States Court of Appeals has issued a temporary stay nullifying a July 26 injunction preventing the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Authority from enforcing its racetrack safety regulations in the states of Louisiana and West Virginia.

For now at least, the stay also makes moot the question of whether the injunction is limited to Louisiana and West Virginia or also applies to Jockeys’ Guild members riding Thoroughbred races in other states. The July 26 order by Terry Doughty, U.S. District Court Judge for the Western District of Louisiana, Lafayette Division, stated that the “geographic scope of the injunction shall be limited to the states of Louisiana and West Virginia,” but also included the phrase “and as to all plaintiffs in this proceeding.”

HISA, FTC Seek Stay Of Federal Judge’s Injunction Blocking HISA In Louisiana, West Virginia

The Horseracing Integrity and Safety Authority and the Federal Trade Commission have each filed emergency motions seeking stays of a federal judge’s injunction effectively blocking the Authority from enforcing its regulations in the states of Louisiana and West Virginia.

The motions were filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in New Orleans.

The injunction, ordered July 26 by Judge Terry A. Doughty in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana, Lafayette Division, was in conjunction with a lawsuit filed against the FTC, HISA and its board members and CEO by the states of Louisiana and West Virginia, their respective racing commissions, Jockeys’ Guild, Inc., Louisiana Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association, Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association and five individuals.

 

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Turmoil At Louisiana Downs Includes Resignation Of Racing General Manager, Uproar Over Horsemen’s Purse Account

Mitch Dennison has resigned as general manager of racing at Louisiana Downs and Kato Moy, recently hired as general manager of the casino side of the Bossier City track, also is no longer employed there, the Shreveport Bossier Journal reports.

In further disarray on Louisiana Downs’ front side, the BloodHorse reports that almost $2 million reserved for the horsemen’s purse account is unaccounted for and that the matter has been turned over to the state’s Attorney General and the Louisiana Racing Commission.

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Study: Inbreeding, Specific Genetic Marker May Decrease A Thoroughbred’s Likelihood To Race

by Paulick Report Staff

 

Scientists at the University College Dublin, the University of Edinburgh, and the Irish equine genetic testing company Plusvital conducted a study to determine the relationship between inbreeding and the likelihood of a Thoroughbred to make it to the races. The study, titled “Inbreeding depression and the probability of racing in the Thoroughbred horse,” was published June 29, 2022 in the peer-reviewed scientific journal “Proceedings of the Royal Society B.”

The study looked at the genomes of 6,000 Thoroughbreds across Europe and Australia, and demonstrated that for every 10 percent increase in inbreeding, there was a 44 percent lower chance that the horse would make it to the races. In addition, the study pointed to a specific genetic marker which was related to a significant decrease in the likelihood that that horse would make it to the races.

According to the study, that genetic marker (EFNA5) is responsible for encoding the ephrin ligand, which is broadly expressed during tissue development and repair. Among its roles are: neonatal muscle development and regeneration, regulation of cardiomyocytes, skeletal development, fracture repair, and cartilage repair.

 

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Nearly 75 Percent Of Veterinarians Concerned That Frequent Injections Could Cause Joint Damage

by Paulick Report Staff

 

Joint inflammation and osteoarthritis (OA) are common issues in competition horses. These conditions often lead to decreased performance and lameness.

Veterinarians can treat OA via joint injections, which involve placing drugs directly into the joint capsule. Some drugs commonly used include corticosteroids, polysulfated glycosaminoglycans, and hyaluronic acid. Biologic therapies like platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cells can also be used.

Vets determine which drugs to use and how often to administer them based on their clinical experience; this is often guided by anecdotal evidence rather than scientific findings. This lack of direct comparisons between treatment options means there are no guidelines for how often a joint should be injected – or for which treatment is best.

 

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