WHO TOOK THE MONEY CHARGES TO VICTORY IN THE $60,000 EVANGELINE DOWNS CLASSIC

ALLIED RACING STABLE RUNNERS COMPLETE WEEKEND STAKES SWEEP

 

Who Took The Money wins the $60,000 EVD Classic. Coady Photography.

 

OPELOUSAS, LA –Deshawn Parker capped off a big weekend stakes sweep with a victory aboard Who Took the Money in the $60,000 EVD Classic at Evangeline Downs on Saturday night.   The race for 4-year-old and up Louisiana-bred runners was contested at the distance of one mile over a track rated fast.

 

Father Goose and Maga Man both broke sharply and set off in a spirited duel into the clubhouse turn.  Highland Creek and Drewhustle were on the chase, while Who Took the Money was allowed to relax near the back of the field.  The opening quarter-mile was covered in a swift 23.36 seconds, and the early battle continued through a half-mile in 46.55 seconds.  As the field moved through the far turn, Highland Creek, the other Allied Racing Stables, LLC (Chester Thomas) runner in the field, was in a striking position just behind the leaders, while Relentless Dancer ranged up with a wide bid.  Deshawn Parker and Who Took the Money were just starting to begin their run but were still seventh as the field move past six furlongs in 1:12.00 seconds.

 

As the field moved to the top of the lane, Highland Creek surged to the lead, Venn was moving through some traffic, while Who Took the Money was gaining with a six-wide move.  At the furlong marker Highland Creek was 1-1/2 lengths in front, but stablemate Who Took the Money was moving fastest in the center of the racetrack.  The two Bret Calhoun trainees were well clear of the field in the final yards, with Who Took the Money rushing past for a ½-length victory.  Runner-up Highland Creek was 3-1/2 lengths clear of the third-place finisher Venn.  The final time for the mile was 1:37.90 seconds.

 

Who Took the Money earned $36,000 for the victory, his seventh from 11 career starts.  The winning purse increased his lifetime earnings to $286,677.

 

The 4-year-old gelding was bred in Louisiana by Allied Racing Stable, LLC.  Sired by Street Boss, the chestnut is out of the Speightstown mare Speights’ Colony.

 

Who Took the Money, sent off as the wagering favorite, rewarded backers with a $4.40 win price, $2.60 to place and $2.40 to show.  Highland Creek paid $3.60 to place and $2.60 to show.  Venn, the longest shot on the board at 41-1, paid $7.80 to show.

 

Live racing resumes on Wednesday with a 5:30pm first post.  The Evangeline Downs Thoroughbred season runs on a Wednesday thru Saturday schedule until August 27.

 

Special Win for Faucheux as Mangelsen Wires Johnston Memorial

Mangelsen with jockey Jareth Loveberry aboard get a head in front of Treys Midnight Moon to win the 42nd running of the Edward J. Johnston Memorial Stakes at Fair Grounds. Hodges Photography / Lou Hodges, Jr.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Favored Who Took the Money scratched after flipping in the gate

New Orleans, LA (March 5, 2022) — All stakes victories are sweet, but this one touched trainer Ron Faucheux deeply. Though this is the 42nd running of the $60,000 Edward J. Johnston Memorial Stakes, 2022 is the first year it was run under its current title. Named for the recently departed, longtime beloved Louisiana horsemen, Eddie Johnston, a dear friend of and mentor to Faucheux, the race took on added significance.

You wouldn’t be the only one wondering if Johnston had a divine hand in setting the stage for Allen Cassedy’s Mangelsen to succeed as the race was over for the initial post-time favorite before it even began.

Loading into the gate, fans and connections alike had one question – could the chalk Who Took the Money run down the front-running Mangelsen before the wire and win his third race in a row? On this day, that question would not be answered.

The Bret Calhoun-trained colt, who was recently named 3-year-old colt of the year by the Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association, flipped, broke through the gate, and ran off before being caught and scratched. It was the perfect situation for Mangelsen to capitalize on, and following a slight delay, the betting public knew just that, with money shifting heavily to make Mangelsen the eventual .50-1 favorite.

“It was unfortunate the 6 horse (Who Took the Money) scratching,” jockey Jareth Loveberry said. “But our plan was still the same. Go to the front, get him to relax on his own, and carry him home.”

Relaxed and leading through all the 25.11, 49.44, and 1:27.52 calls by as many as four lengths, Mangelsen didn’t feel pressure until the homestretch when 4.00-1 closer Treys Midnite Moon made a move on the rail that put him in front in the deep stretch, but only for a handful of strides. After taking a bad step near the rail earlier on, jockey Jareth Loveberry made sure to finish down the center of the turf course which separated him from his rail-rallying pursuer, but that didn’t stop Mangelsen from seeing the threat, responding, and fighting forward to come home in 1:40.61 for the mile (about) over a firm course with the rail eight feet out.

In the winner’s circle, the emotions came through for Fair Grounds’ 2020-21 leading trainer Faucheux, who with this win regained a one-win lead on four-time Brad Cox for this meet’s crown.

“Today was all about Eddie Johnston and his family coming out,” Faucheux said. “Eddie was one of the greatest friends I have ever had. A true mentor, he taught me so much. I just can’t be happier to win this race. This goes down as maybe the best win of my life. That’s how much Eddie meant to me. This is definitely one I’ll never forget.”

One dimensional and one away from his tenth win, Mangelsen’s career record is now 28-9-4-2, sitting pretty with earnings of $194,800 and ready for his next front-running score.

 

Who Took the Money’s Form Casts Shadow over Eddie Johnston Field of Eleven

The 42nd edition of the $60,000 Edward J. Johnston Memorial Stakes, running under its current title for the first time on Saturday at Fair Grounds, attracted a large field of LA-bred 3-year-olds and up. Everything from first-time-turfers to multiple turf stake winners will compete on the lawn, but Allied Racing’s Who Took the Money stands out from the crowd.

Winning the Louisiana Champions Day Turf in just his second grass start, Bret Calhoun’s 4-year old is two for three on the lawn after beating a salty group of optional claimers last out, including Louisiana Champions Day Classic winner, Grand Luwegee.  Flashing an impressive late turn of foot in the Louisiana Champions Day Turf, he rallied from 12 lengths back at the third call to win by 5 ¾ lengths over Treys Midnite Moon, Budro Talking, and Mangelsen – all of who will test him again in the Eddie Johnston. Deshawn Parker keeps the mount on the 4/5 morning line favorite and will begin his voyage from post six.

If anyone could steal it from Who Took the Money, Allen Cassedy’s front-runner Mangelsen seems like a logical choice. After speeding off in the Louisiana Champions Day Turf and tiring to finish fourth, Mangelsen’s form came into question next out when losing by 9 ½ lengths as the favorite in an optional claiming starter allowance, but trainer Ron Faucheux righted the ship with the next out effort, as the gelding led throughout to beat three of his Eddie Johnston foes.  Jareth Loveberry will ride Mangelsen for the first time, sending from post seven (9-2 ML).

Multiple turf stakes winner, Hermilo Racing’s Budro Talking will make his first start in Hugo Rodriguez’s barn after being claimed out of the February optional claimer where he finished behind Mangelsen, Get Them Justin, and City Park. With a late-running style, Budro Talking will break from post eight under Mitchell Murrill looking for his 10th lifetime turf win (12-1 ML).

Snake Racing’s 7-year-old Treys Midnite Moon, a 15-time winner with a stakes victory on his resume, looks for his first win in 2022 after finishing on top five times in 2021. Third in his last three starts, including three back to Who Took the Money in the Louisiana Champions Day Turf, trainer “Bunky” Richards calls on James Graham to ride this late-kicker from post five (8-1 ML).

The remainder of the field with post position, jockey/trainer and morning line odds is as follows: Spartan Team investment’s Ballinonabudjet (post one, Colby Hernandez/Michelle Lovell, 15-1 ML) looks to make it three wins in a row while seeking the elusive first turf victory in his sixth attempt; meet-leading owner Brittlyn Stables’ Behemah Star (post two, Reylu Gutierrez/Jose Camejo, 12-1 ML) began his career sprinting and finishing 10th on the grass but has not tried since, though he exits an impressive third-level allowance dirt win at Fair Grounds in January; Autumn Hill Farms’ Get Them Justin (post three, Jose Riquelme/Sturgis Ducoing, 15-1 ML) finished second last out to Mangelsen, improving in his third turf start; Jeanne Dolan’s Changi (post four, Carlos Ulloa/Jeanne Dolan, 30-1 ML) has not won since July 2020 in 19 tries; Norman Stables’ Drewhustle (post nine, Aubrie Green/Lonnie Briley, 20-1 ML) exits a third-place allowance finish at Delta Downs but won the race prior on Fair Grounds’ dirt course; MAT Investments’ City Park (post ten, Pedro Cotto Jr./Eduardo Ramirez, 12-1 ML) is 6 for 7 on the grass, finishing third to Mangelsen and Get Them Justin last out, where he was claimed from Hugo Rodriguez; Glockenburg’s Mr. Universe (post eleven, Jose Vega/Gennadi Dorochenko, 20-1 ML) won against second-level allowance company last out, his second tally in seven turf tries.

Carded as race number eight, the last of three turf stakes races on the day, post time is scheduled for 5:36 pm CT.

 

Who Took the Money Overcomes All Obstacles, Remains Undefeated in Crescent City Derby

State-bred Star Gets Loose Pre-Race, Still Holds Off Stablemate

 

Gabriel Saez aboard Who Took The Money outduels Highland Creek and Adam Beschizza to win the 49th running of the Crescent City Derby at Fair Grounds.  Hodges Photography / Lou Hodges, Jr.

 

To say trainer Bret Calhoun had some anxious moments prior to the $100,000 Crescent City Derby would be like saying Saints fans won’t miss Drew Brees.

Allied Racing Stable’s homebred Who Took the Money, the overwhelming .40-1 favorite, decided to give his 11 3-year-old rivals a fighting chance when he flipped over in the post parade, tossed jockey Gabe Saez, and briefly ran off. Once corralled and deemed fit to run by a state veterinarian, he was all business, rallying along the rail and holding off his game stablemate Highland Creek by a nose.

“He’s a big strong horse and he’s still learning is lessons,” Calhoun said. “Both the horse and jockey were very game in their performances.”

Who Took the Money settled in sixth early on behind longshot leaders Wise Verdict and Wrongwayhighway, while Highland Creek settled in third. The field bunched entering the far turn when Adam Beschizza and Highland Creek opted to tip out wide, while Saez and Who Took the Money held the rail, and scooted through the large opening inside when the leaders fanned off the turn. Who Took the Money kicked clear but Highland Creek was resolute, though he ultimate came up short, with the winner traveling the 1 1/16 miles in 1:44.73. It was a length back to Unanimously in third.

Saez was been aboard Who Took the Money in both of his prior two starts and chalked up the pre-race incident to bad luck. But once the gates opened, it was business as usual.

“It was just one of those things that happens every so often,” Saez said. “I was able to save ground on the inside and got through and he kicked on from there.”

Who Took the Money has come a long way in a short period of time for Calhoun, as he was an unraced maiden on the morning of February 5 and is now 3-for-3 and a stakes winner. Wild and hard to handle early on, Calhoun opted to geld the son of Street Boss prior to his career debut and Who Took the Money won by 4 ½ lengths. He entered off another easy win in a March 6 two-turn state-bred allowance, and is now 3-for-3.

Calhoun and Allied’s owner Chester Thomas teamed to win the Louisiana Derby (G2) in 2019 with By My Standards, and while Who Took the Money isn’t in that class, the latter still had plenty of reason to celebrate.

“We’re having a lot of fun with these Louisiana breds,” Thomas said. “You’ve got to give it to Gabe, what a heart, he rode a wonderful race. What can you say, Bret and everyone has done a great job.”