Jockey Club Calls for Dramatic Industry Changes

A 23rd horse died at Santa Anita Park only three days after racing resumed; it is the 23rd horse fatality in the past three months.

The string of deaths at Santa Anita isn’t the first spike in fatalities at a U.S. racetrack — these tragic events have happened before at other tracks and they will continue to occur without significant reform to the horse racing industry. The issue isn’t about a single track; horse fatalities are a nationwide problem that needs to be addressed on an industrywide basis.

There has been tremendous focus on the track surface, but the core of the problem lies in a fundamentally flawed system that falls far short of international horse racing standards — standards that better protect horses and result in far fewer injuries and deaths.

Chief among the principles that make up the standards of the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities (IFHA) are those guiding the development of an effective anti-doping program and the regulation of the use of performance-enhancing drugs and drugs that can mask injuries, both of which can result in injuries and deaths. Under IFHA policies, commonly used therapeutic medications capable of masking pain and other symptoms of discomfort must be withdrawn days or even weeks prior to the race as compared to hours before the race in the U.S. IFHA policies also encourage rest to recover from injuries as opposed to policies here that facilitate treatment so training can continue, imperiling both horse and rider.

It’s time we joined the rest of the world in putting in place the best measures to protect the health and safety of our equine athletes and that can be done only with comprehensive reform. Reform that includes creation of an independent central rule-making authority, full transparency into all medical treatments and procedures, comprehensive drug reform, and strict anti-doping testing both in an out of competition.

On March 28, 2019, The Jockey Club published a major white paper — Vision 2025, To Prosper, Horse Racing Needs Comprehensive Reform — outlining the need for reforms and specific recommendations, including passage of H.R. 1754, the Horseracing Integrity Act of 2019.

The Jockey Club, founded in 1894 and dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing, is the breed registry for North American Thoroughbreds. In fulfillment of its mission, The Jockey Club, directly or through subsidiaries, provides support and leadership on a wide range of important industry initiatives, and it serves the information and technology needs of owners, breeders, media, fans and farms. It is the sole funding source for America’s Best Racing, the broad-based fan development initiative for Thoroughbred racing. You can follow America’s Best Racing at americasbestracing.net. Additional information is available at jockeyclub.com.

 

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The Jockey Club Calls for Dramatic Reforms to Protect Racehorses

Thursday, March 28, 2019
The Jockey Club today released a major white paper calling for comprehensive reform of the U.S. horse racing industry including a major overhaul of drug use and uniform out-of-competition drug testing, citing the need for “transparency into the medical treatment, injuries, and health of all racehorses.”

The paper’s release follows the death of 22 racehorses at California’s Santa Anita Park in less than three months. The Jockey Club wrote that “it would be a mistake to view the Santa Anita fatalities as an isolated situation — spikes in the deaths of horses have occurred at other tracks and they will continue to occur without significant reforms.”

The Jockey Club was particularly critical of drug use in the horse racing industry saying that “improper drug use can directly lead to horse injuries and deaths. Horses aren’t human and the only way they can tell us if something is wrong is by reacting to a symptom. If that symptom is masked, the results can be devastating.” And that “we lag behind cheaters and abusers and by the time we have caught up they have moved on to the next designer substance.”

The Jockey Club expressed its strong support for federal legislation citing the Horse Racing Integrity Act of 2019, H.R. 1754, which would create a private, independent, horse racing anti-doping authority responsible for developing and administering a nationwide anti-doping and medication control program. The program would be administered by the United States Anti-Doping Agency, the body responsible for administering anti-doping programs for human athletes including the U.S. Olympic teams.

“For far too long, cheaters have been abusing the system and the horses are most often the ones to suffer,” said James L. Gagliano, president and chief operating officer of The Jockey Club. “It is particularly disturbing that there is little out-of-competition drug testing in the United States. U.S. horse racing lags far behind international standards. It’s time we joined the rest of the world in putting in place the best measures to protect the health and safety of our equine athletes.”

In addition to reforming how drugs are used and monitored, The Jockey Club is calling for other reforms targeted at health of equine athletes, including:

  • Enhanced Race Surface Analysis
  • Reporting of all Injuries During Racing and Training
  • More Comprehensive Pre-race Veterinarian Examination
  • Use of Approved Medications Only
  • Confirmed Fitness to Train
  • Industrywide Contributions to Aftercare

“Will we ever know the exact cause of spikes in horse fatalities? Unless there is change in the industry that answer is, sadly, probably not,” wrote The Jockey Club. “A key to this change is the requirement of full transparency into the medical treatment, injuries, and health of all racehorses. Today, we can’t fully see what is going on with a horse because of differing state and track practices, antiquated practices, and purposeful deceit about what drugs are given to horses at what times.”

The Jockey Club is the breed registry for Thoroughbreds in North America. Since its founding 125 years ago, it has been dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing, focusing on improvements to the integrity, health, and safety of the sport. The Jockey Club has long held that horses must only race when they are free from the effects of medication.

Download the report: Vision 2025 – To Prosper, Horse Racing Needs Comprehensive Reform. For additional information, please visit The Jockey Club or the Coalition for Horse Racing Integrity.

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MAKE YOUR PLANS! LTBA Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet, Sunday, March 31

Celebrate
Louisiana Bred Thoroughbreds

at the
LTBA Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet
Sunday, March 31st

Dear LTBA Member:

You are cordially invited to attend our 2019 Annual Membership Meeting, at Equine Sales Company of Louisiana, in Opelousas, LA on Sunday March 31, 2019. Doors will open at 2:30 pm.

Awards will be presented to the breeders and owners of the outstanding accredited Louisiana Bred Horses of 2018 as well as the overall Horse of the Year. From 3:00 pm till 7:00pm  Equine Sales Company Sale Arena will be the site as awards will be presented to the owner of the leading Stallion, the owner of the Broodmare of the Year, the Leading Breeder of 2018, as well as the High Percentage Breeder of the Year. See the attached sheet of this year’s champions.

As a special treat, this year we will have someone from The Jockey Club on hand to explain and to answer the many questions on the “Paperless” registration process. This is a big change for everyone, so expect to learn something.

Our program will also include live entertainment. As we combine the 2yo in training sale with our awards banquet we expect a large crowd as well as fun for everyone.

Sincerely,
Roger A. Heitzmann III
Secretary / Treasurer

 

What:       LTBA Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet
When:      Sunday, March 31st, 3:00 p.m.
Where:     Equine Sales Facility,
372 Harry Guilbeau Road   Opelousas, Louisiana  70570

 

Any questions or need more info call

Roger A. Heitzmann III, Secretary/Treasurer

Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association

504-947-4676, 800-772-1195

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Jockey Club Discontinues Experimental Free Handicap for 2019

Because of waning relevance and interest, for 2019 The Jockey Club ceased publishing its Top 2-Year-Old Rankings.

First published in 1933 as the Experimental Free Handicap, the hypothetical ranking of 2-year-olds at a distance of 1 1/16 miles was a variation of England’s Free Handicap ranking. Seven of the 13 Triple Crown winners were the highest ranked in the Experimental Free Handicap. The most recent winner of the Triple Crown, Justify in 2018, was unraced as a juvenile.

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2019 Jockey Club Fact Book Available

As of Thursday, February 14, 2019, The Jockey Club’s 2019 edition of the Fact Book is available in the Resources section of its website at jockeyclub.com.

The online Fact Book is a statistical and informational guide to Thoroughbred breeding, racing and auction sales in North America. It also features a directory of Canadian, international, national, and state organizations.

Links to the Breeding Statistics report that is released by The Jockey Club each September and the Report of Mares Bred information that is published by The Jockey Club each October can be found in the Breeding section of the Fact Book. Starting this year, the Fact Book will be updated quarterly, and additional statistics will be made available in the coming months to provide additional insight into overall trends in Thoroughbred breeding, sales, and racing.

The 2019 editions of State Fact Books, which feature detailed breeding, racing and auction sales information specific to numerous states, Canadian provinces, and Puerto Rico, are also available on The Jockey Club website. The State Fact Books are updated monthly.

The Jockey Club, founded in 1894 and dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing, is the breed registry for North American Thoroughbreds. In fulfillment of its mission, The Jockey Club, directly or through subsidiaries, provides support and leadership on a wide range of important industry initiatives, and it serves the information and technology needs of owners, breeders, media, fans and farms. It is the sole funding source for America’s Best Racing, the broad-based fan development initiative for Thoroughbred racing. You can follow America’s Best Racing at americasbestracing.net. Additional information is available at jockeyclub.com.

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The Jockey Club Releases 2018 Report of Mares Bred Statistics

The Jockey Club today released Report of Mares Bred (RMB) statistics for the 2018 breeding season. Based on RMBs received through October 16, 2018, The Jockey Club reports that 1,214 stallions covered 30,274 mares in North America during 2018.

The Jockey Club estimates an additional 3,000 to 4,000 mares will be reported as bred during the 2018 breeding season.

The number of stallions declined 9.5% from the 1,342 reported at this time in 2017, and the number of mares bred decreased 5.0% from the 31,863 reported last year. The number of stallions covering 125 or more mares increased from 60 in 2017 to 62 in 2018.

Further book size analysis shows a 3.0% increase in the number of mares bred to stallions with a book size of 125 or more in 2018 when compared to 2017 as reported at this time last year; a 1.4% decrease in mares bred to stallions with a book size between 100 and 124; a 7.0% increase in mares bred to stallions with a book size between 75 and 99; a 6.7% decrease in mares bred to stallions with a book size between 50 and 74; a 9.6% decrease in mares bred to stallions with a book size between 25 and 49; and a 16.7% decrease in mares bred to stallions with a book size fewer than 25.

The percentage of broodmares covered by large book size (125 or more) stallions increased from 29.4% in 2017 to 31.9% in 2018. From 2015-2017, this percentage had remained constant at approximately 29%, up from 20.5% in 2014.

The proportion of stallions with book sizes of 125 or more mares grew from 3.1% in 2014 to 4.5% from 2015-2017. In 2018, this proportion increased to 5.1%.

2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
% stallions with book size >125 3.1% 4.5% 4.5% 4.5% 5.1%
% mares covered by stallions with book size >125 20.5% 29.1% 28.7% 29.4% 31.9%

Note: Statistics summarized as of October 16 of the breeding seasons indicated in the columns above; as reports of mares bred continue to be received, final statistics are subject to change.

RMB statistics for all reported stallions in 2018 are available through the Fact Book section of The Jockey Club’s website at jockeyclub.com.

The stallion Into Mischief led all stallions with 245 mares bred in 2018. Rounding out the top five by number of RMBs were Cupid, 223; Klimt, 222; Practical Joke, 220; and, Violence, 214.

Kentucky traditionally leads North America in Thoroughbred breeding activity. During 2018, Kentucky’s 228 reported stallions covered 17,322 mares, or 57.2% of all of the mares reported bred in North America. The number of mares bred to Kentucky stallions increased 0.3% percent compared with the 17,275 reported at this time last year.

Of the top 10 states and provinces by number of mares reported bred in 2018, Kentucky, California, Maryland, and Pennsylvania stallions covered more mares in 2018 than in 2017, as reported at this time last year. The following table shows the top 10 states and provinces ranked by number of mares reported bred in 2018:

State/Province 2017 Stallions 2018 Stallions Pct. Change 2017 Mares Bred 2018 Mares Bred Pct. Change
Kentucky 229 228 -0.4% 17,275 17,322 0.3%
California 137 137 0.0% 2,356 2,482 5.3%
Florida 92 78 -15.2% 2,073 1,917 -7.5%
Louisiana 93 80 -14.0% 1,235 1,125 -8.9%
New York 58 48 -17.2% 1,326 1,115 -15.9%
Maryland 30 30 0.0% 768 867 12.9%
Ontario 38 37 -2.6% 810 620 -23.5%
Pennsylvania 36 32 -11.1% 563 610 8.3%
Indiana 59 57 -3.4% 554 506 -8.7%
Oklahoma 54 43 -20.4% 537 470 -12.5%

Note: Each incident in which a mare was bred to more than one stallion and appeared on multiple RMBs is counted separately. As such, mares bred totals listed in the table above may differ slightly from counts of distinct mares bred.

In addition, Report of Mares Bred information on stallions that bred mares in North America is available through report 36P or a subscription service at equineline.com/ReportOfMaresBred.

The Jockey Club, founded in 1894 and dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing, is the breed registry for North American Thoroughbreds. In fulfillment of its mission, The Jockey Club, directly or through subsidiaries, provides support and leadership on a wide range of important industry initiatives, and it serves the information and technology needs of owners, breeders, media, fans and farms. It is the sole funding source for America’s Best Racing, the broad-based fan development initiative for Thoroughbred racing. You can follow America’s Best Racing at americasbestracing.net. Additional information is available at jockeyclub.com.

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The Jockey Club Releases 2017 Breeding Statistics

Monday, October 01, 2018

The Jockey Club today reported that 1,778 stallions covered 34,288 mares in North America during 2017, according to statistics compiled through Sept. 26, 2018. These breedings have resulted in 21,130 live foals of 2018 being reported to The Jockey Club on Live Foal Reports.

The Jockey Club estimates that the number of live foals reported so far is approximately 90 percent complete. The reporting of live foals of 2018 is down 2.3 percent from last year at this time when The Jockey Club had received reports for 21,624 live foals of 2017.

In addition to the 21,130 live foals of 2018 reported through Sept. 26, The Jockey Club also received 2,516 No Foal Reports for the 2018 foaling season. Ultimately, the 2018 registered foal crop is projected to reach 21,500.

The number of stallions declined 4.6 percent from the 1,863 reported for 2016 at this time last year, while the number of mares bred declined 4.9 percent from the 36,045 reported for 2016.

The 2017 breeding statistics are available alphabetically by stallion name through the Resources – Fact Book link on The Jockey Club homepage at jockeyclub.com.

“It is important to note that the live foals reported in The Jockey Club breeding statistics are by conception area and do not represent the state in which a foal was born,” said Matt Iuliano, executive vice president and executive director, The Jockey Club. “Breeding statistics also are not a representation of a stallion’s fertility record.”

Kentucky annually leads all states and provinces in terms of Thoroughbred breeding activity. Kentucky-based stallions accounted for 50.7 percent of the mares reported bred in North America in 2017 and 58.5 percent of the live foals reported for 2018.

The 17,401 mares reported bred to 235 Kentucky stallions in 2017 have produced 12,370 live foals, a 0.2 percent decrease on the 12,396 Kentucky-sired live foals of 2017 reported at this time last year. The number of mares reported bred to Kentucky stallions in 2017 decreased 2.9 percent compared to the 17,912 reported for 2016 at this time last year.

Among the 10 states and provinces with the most mares covered in 2017, only three produced more live foals in 2018 than in 2017 as reported at this time last year: Ontario, New Mexico, and Pennsylvania. The following table shows the 10 states and provinces, ranked by number of state/province-sired live foals of 2018 reported through Sept. 26, 2018.

2017 Mares Bred 2017 Live Foals 2018 Live Foals Percent Change in Live Foals
Kentucky 17,401 12,396 12,370 -0.2%
California 2,573 1,726 1,577 -8.6%
Florida 2,286 1,514 1,217 -19.6%
New York 1,344 912 777 -14.8%
Louisiana 1,336 799 713 -10.8%
Ontario 908 397 495 24.7%
Maryland 783 500 483 -3.4%
New Mexico 794 370 372 0.5%
Pennsylvania 673 289 373 29.1%
Oklahoma 773 341 329 -3.5%

The statistics include 334 progeny of stallions standing in North America but foaled abroad, as reported by foreign stud book authorities at the time of publication.

Country Live Foals Country Live Foals
Republic of Korea 117 India 4
Saudi Arabia 72 Peru 3
Ireland 33 Russia 3
Great Britain 25 Dominican Republic 2
Japan 24 Germany 2
Philippines 20 Barbados 1
Australia 12 Brazil 1
Argentina 7 Pakistan 1
Mexico 6 Venezuela 1

The report also includes 90 mares bred to 27 stallions in North America on Southern Hemisphere time; the majority of these mares have not foaled.

As customary, a report listing the number of mares bred in 2018 will be released later this month.

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Reports of Mares Bred Due at The Jockey Club by August 1

The Jockey Club reminds stallion managers to submit their Reports of Mares Bred (RMBs) for the 2018 breeding season by August 1.

“To ensure that the breeding statistics we release in the fall are as accurate as possible, we request that RMBs be submitted by August 1,” said Matt Iuliano, executive vice president and executive director of The Jockey Club.

In addition, stallion managers who submit completed RMBs by August 1 are among the first to receive their Stallion Service Certificates, which facilitates the timely registration of 2019 foals.

Reports of Mares Bred may be submitted via Interactive Registration at registry.jockeyclub.com or a form is available by email, fax, or mail by contacting inquiries@jockeyclub.com.

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Applications Now Open for The Jockey Club’s Academic Scholarships

The Jockey Club has announced that it will again be awarding $21,000 in college scholarships for the academic year that begins in the fall of 2018.

The Jockey Club Scholarship, which is being offered for the second year, will provide $15,000 ($7,500 per semester) to a student who is pursuing a bachelor’s degree or higher at any university and has demonstrated interest in pursuing a career in the Thoroughbred racing industry.

The following criteria will be considered for The Jockey Club Scholarship: career aspirations, activities involving the equine or Thoroughbred industry, and high academic achievement.

That scholarship complements The Jockey Club Jack Goodman Scholarship, which was created in 2007 and is awarded annually to a student or students at the University of Arizona’s Race Track Industry Program (RTIP). The annual $6,000 ($3,000 per semester) Jack Goodman Scholarship is based on academic achievement, a proposed career path in the Thoroughbred racing industry, and previous industry involvement.

The deadline for both applications is March 31, 2018.

“The Jockey Club strives to facilitate the involvement of young individuals in horse racing,” said James L. Gagliano, president and chief operating officer of The Jockey Club. “These scholarships will reward students who are passionate about the sport and interested in working in the industry upon graduation.”

Goodman, a resident of Tucson, is a longtime member of The Jockey Club and is one of three founders of the RTIP. To date, there have been 11 recipients of The Jockey Club Jack Goodman Scholarship, and nine of them are working in the racing industry.

Applications and other pertinent information about both scholarships are available at jockeyclub.com under Advocacy/Promotion, Education. The recipients of each scholarship will be announced this summer.

The Jockey Club, founded in 1894 and dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing, is the breed registry for North American Thoroughbreds. In fulfillment of its mission, The Jockey Club, directly or through subsidiaries, provides support and leadership on a wide range of important industry initiatives, and it serves the information and technology needs of owners, breeders, media, fans and farms. It is the sole funding source for America’s Best Racing, the broad-based fan development initiative for Thoroughbred racing. You can follow America’s Best Racing at americasbestracing.net. Additional information is available at jockeyclub.com.

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Jockey Club Registry Publishes Names Released from Active Use

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Today The Jockey Club published a list of more than 42,000 names released from active use. This list is sortable by letter and available on registry.jockeyclub.com and mobile.registry.jockeyclub.com to help customers with name selections for claiming and reserving names. A majority of the released names are from horses more than 10 years old that have not raced or been used for breeding during the preceding five years. Names selected from the list for re-use are subject to approval by The Jockey Club.

Name selections can be submitted to The Jockey Club from the registry website or can be submitted via iOS and Android mobile applications. The Naming Application is available for download free of charge and provides a fast and convenient way to reserve, change, or claim a name.

“The Jockey Club’s Registry provides a variety of platforms through which owners and breeders can easily claim and reserve names,” said Matt Iuliano, The Jockey Club’s executive vice president and executive director. “For those who are unsure if a desired name is available or have yet to decide on a name, The Jockey Club’s recently released names list and Online Names Book can help you search for a  name and help you immediately identify names that are already in use.”

The list of recently released names and the Online Names Book are updated daily as names are claimed.

Interactive RegistrationTM (IR) is the most efficient means to submit name applications to the Registry. Name applications submitted through IR are preliminarily screened to eliminate direct matches with names unavailable for use. Owners who name their Thoroughbreds through IR receive their first choice approximately 75 percent of the time. More than 1.5 million IR transactions have been recorded since its launch in 1996.

The Jockey Club, founded in 1894 and dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing, is the breed registry for North American Thoroughbreds. In fulfillment of its mission, The Jockey Club, directly or through subsidiaries, provides support and leadership on a wide range of important industry initiatives, and it serves the information and technology needs of owners, breeders, media, fans and farms. It is the sole funding source for America’s Best Racing, the broad-based fan development initiative for Thoroughbred racing. You can follow America’s Best Racing at americasbestracing.net. Additional information is available at jockeyclub.com.

 

 

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