Secret Circle Relocating to Elite Thoroughbreds

The son of Eddington won two Breeders’ Cup World Championships races.

Secret Circle , the winner of two Breeders’ Cup World Championships races, is being relocated from Kentucky to Michele Rodriguez’s Elite Thoroughbreds in Louisiana in a deal brokered by Chad Schumer of Schumer Bloodstock.

A brilliantly fast horse for Bob Baffert, Secret Circle pulled off a rare achievement when he won the 2011 Sentient Jet Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Sprint and two years later captured the Xpressbet Breeders’ Cup Sprint (G1). Out of 16 lifetime starts, the son of Eddington  was winner or runner-up in 10 graded stakes. He retired with more than $3.67 million in earnings.

Read BloodHorse Article

Applications Now Open for The Jockey Club’s Academic Scholarships

The Jockey Club announced Monday, January 13, 2020 that applications are now open for its two college scholarships. The scholarships total $21,000 and will be awarded for the academic year that begins in the fall of 2020.

The Jockey Club Scholarship was first awarded in 2017 and provides $15,000 ($7,500 per semester) to a student who is pursuing a bachelor’s degree or higher at any university and has demonstrated interest in pursuing a career in the Thoroughbred racing industry.

The following criteria will be considered for The Jockey Club Scholarship: career aspirations, activities involving the equine or Thoroughbred industry, and high academic achievement.

That scholarship complements The Jockey Club Jack Goodman Scholarship, which was created in 2007 and is awarded annually to a student at the University of Arizona’s Race Track Industry Program (RTIP). The annual $6,000 ($3,000 per semester) Jack Goodman Scholarship is based on academic achievement, a proposed career path in the Thoroughbred racing industry, and previous industry involvement.

The deadline for both applications is March 31, 2020.

“The Jockey Club is proud to offer these scholarships in an effort to support young individuals who are interested in pursuing a career in the horse racing industry,” said James L. Gagliano, president and chief operating officer, The Jockey Club.

Goodman was a resident of Tucson, a longtime member of The Jockey Club and one of three founders of the RTIP.

More information and links to applications for the scholarships can be found here: jockeyclub.com/Default.asp?section=Initiatives&area=15. The recipients of each scholarship will be announced this summer.

The Jockey Club, founded in 1894 and dedicated to the improvement of Thoroughbred breeding and racing, is the breed registry for North American Thoroughbreds. In fulfillment of its mission, The Jockey Club, directly or through subsidiaries, provides support and leadership on a wide range of important industry initiatives, and it serves the information and technology needs of owners, breeders, media, fans and farms. It founded America’s Best Racing (americasbestracing.net), the broad-based fan development initiative for Thoroughbred racing, and in partnership with the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association, operates OwnerView (ownerview.com), the ownership resource. Additional information is available at jockeyclub.com.

Louisiana-bred Gives Violence Second Rising Star of the Day

9th at FG , Alw, $46000 (6f) Winner: No Parole, c, 3 by Violence

Maggi Moss’s No Parole (Violence), a 14 1/4-length debut winner here Dec. 15–good for a 90 Beyer Speed Figure–again proved too much for his Louisiana-bred foes to handle as he romped to become the third ‘TDN Rising Star’ of the day and second by Hill ‘n’ Dale’s Violence. Off at prohibitive 1-5 odds, the $75,000 KEESEP yearling seized command early in the wet going, clicked off splits of :21.79 and :44.45 and cruised home all by his lonesome with just a couple of reminders before being geared down late to canter under the line 13 1/4 lengths to the good in 1:10.24. Palvera (My Pal Charlie) was best of the rest.

The winner’s dam was a stakes-winning turf sprinter at Penn National and hails from the extended female family of graded winners License Fee (Black Tie Affair {Ire}) and Greeley’s Galaxy (Mr. Greeley). She has a short yearling filly by Connect.

 

Read TDN Article

Purses Up, Pari-Mutuel Handle Down in 2019

Decline in pari-mutuel handle ends a four-year stretch of gains.

For all of racing’s problems in 2019, there certainly were plenty of locations where horsemen had reason for optimism behind strong purses. But, there most assuredly are numbers of concern in the year-end economic indicators released Jan. 6 by Equibase.

Fueled by strong purse growth in Kentucky—specifically Churchill Downs—purses for races in the United States increased 4.5% in 2019 to $1,167,921,650 compared with 2018. It’s the second straight season of strong growth for U.S. purses as they improved 3.5% in 2018.

Read BloodHorse Article

Amoss Shifting Focus From Claiming Game To Young Horses

By purses earned ($5.3 million), Tom Amoss enjoyed the third best season of his 33-year career in 2019, but according to the New Orleans native, numbers do not tell the entire story.

“The comments have always been, ‘he’s a very good trainer, but who has he developed into a major horse’,” Amoss said. “Winning the Kentucky Oaks with Serengeti Empress is helping to change that narrative, and that’s why 2019 was such a good year.” 

“We had quite a few nice 2-year-old winners last year and we’ve got some unraced horses back there (Fair Grounds backstretch), that in the month of January, people will really enjoy watching,” Amoss continued. “The shift from ‘he’s a good claiming trainer’ to ‘he’s a good trainer’ is something that’s occurring right now. That encompasses a lot of people, not just me. I’m talking about the stable.” 

Amoss is still very active in the claiming game. He claimed 53 horses in 2019, but 73 were taken from him. According to Amoss, the claiming business has “changed dramatically” in recent years.

“There was a time 10-15 years ago when I was actively claiming horses and either I got the one I was after or I lost a shake to one other person,” Amoss explained. “That’s not the case anymore. There are some super-sized stables out there now who are literally claiming four horses a day at a single track. Now, I’ve never been that guy. They’re losing horses on a regular basis and they need to claim to replace them. I actually enjoy being creative doing it, but the landscape the way it is, it is getting harder and harder just to rely on claiming.” 

Whether the shift to developing younger horses has happened organically, out of necessity, or a combination of both, Amoss feels the Kentucky Oaks win with Serengeti Empress has helped take his game to a new level.

Purchased by Amoss at the Keeneland September sale for $70,000 on behalf of owner Joel Politi, the newly turned 4-year-old daughter of Alternation has had more ups than downs in her 12-race career, winning five times. In addition to the Kentucky Oaks (G1), she also won the Rachel Alexandra (G2) at Fair Grounds and as 2-year-old, the Pocahontas (G2) at Churchill. She was most recently seen finishing third behind Blue Prize and Midnight Bisou in the Breeders’ Cup Distaff (G1) at Santa Anita.

“I’m very proud of her third in the Breeders’ Cup,” Amoss said. “It took two very good older mares to pass her at the end of that race. She ran against the best all year long, and usually when you do that over and over again at some point, they say uncle.”

Following a well-deserved break from the track, Serengeti Empress recently returned to Amoss’ Fair Grounds base, and she is scheduled breeze for the first time since the Breeders’ Cup on Sunday morning.

“She’s a horse who gets herself ready quickly,” Amoss explained. “We have not picked out a spot yet, but look for her to be ready to run towards the end of January.” 

Outside of the Breeders’ Cup, all of the starts Serengeti Empress has made have come against age restricted company. Amoss knows the waters are deeper, and despite the fact that she’s also run well in one-turn races, he plans on keeping her long against the best the distaff division has to offer. 

“I was surprised to see that Midnight Bisou is coming back this year, I thought she’d go on to be a broodmare,” Amoss said. “Monomoy Girl is on the radar as a possible comeback horse this year as well. A lot of the 3-year-old fillies beat each other along the way last year. We are making the transition to her 4-year-old year, and there are still some very good older mares still around.”

Jockey McMahon Earns Milestone Victory

C.J. McMahon earned his 1,000th career win Jan. 1 at Delta Downs.

 

Multiple graded stakes-winning jockey C.J. McMahon celebrated the new year with a milestone win Jan. 1 at Delta Downs.  Riding 3-5 favorite Cavallotto in the fourth race Wednesday, McMahon delivered a front-running score in the one-mile claiming event to secure the 1,000th victory of his career. Cavallotto is trained by Karl Broberg, who in 2019 finished as the leading conditioner by wins in North America for the sixth straight season.

Broberg regularly calls on McMahon and in 2019 the pair teamed to win 132 races from 489 starts, including a victory in the Bluebonnet Stakes with Ima Discreet Lady in April at Lone Star Park.

Read BloodHorse Article

January Calendar of Events from the Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association

 Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association would like to share the following list of dates of interest to Louisiana horsemen and women.

Brought to you by Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders AssociationWhispering Oaks Farm, Clear Creek Studand Equine Sales CompanyClick images to link to more information

REMINDER
Dec 31

  • Louisiana Stallion Registrations Due
  • Louisiana Futurity Nominations Due (pregnant mares)

Jan 1

  • New Years Day
  • LTBA Offices Closed in observance of New Years

Jan 10

  • Orleans S., Delta Downs, Vinton, LA

Jan 11

  • Sam’s Town S., Delta Downs, Vinton, LA

Jan 18

  • Road to the Derby Kickoff Day, New Orleans Fair Grounds; G3 Lecompte S, Silverbulletday S., Duncan F. Kenner S., Louisiana S., G3 Col. E. R. Bradley H., Marie G. Krantz Mem. S.


Jan 19 Clear Creek Stud Stallion Presentation

Jan 20

  • Martin Luther King Day

Jan 25

  • Nelson J. Menard Memorial S., New Orleans Fair Grounds

Jan 27

  • Louisiana Racing Commission Meeting, 9:00 a.m., Monteleone Hotel, Riverview Room, New Orleans

 

 

 

Would you like to sponsor a newsletter? Reach @ 2,500 readers.

Please contact Linda 985-386-0360, linda@louisianabred.com or Roger 504-947-4676, roger@louisianabred.com for cost and availability.

Do you have a date pertaining to Louisiana-breds that you would like included in an upcoming calendar? Please contact Linda 985-386-0360, linda@louisianabred.com or Roger 504-947-4676, roger@louisianabred.comfor consideration.

 

Any questions or need more info call

Roger A. Heitzmann III, Secretary/Treasurer

Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association

504-947-4676

YEAR END REMINDERS

The LTBA would like to remind breeders of several important deadlines coming up before the end of the year.

Pay Accreditation Fees
for 2019 Foals

By December 31, 2019
Louisiana Accreditation fees are $75 for 2019 weanlings. On January 1, 2020 foals become yearlings and the rate increases to $250.

Louisiana Futurity Nominations (Pregnant Mares)
Due by December 31, 2019

Louisiana Stallion Registrations
Due by December 31, 2019

Can Horses Be Sleep Deprived?

by

 

Sleep is vitally important to horses, but equines don’t require the eight consecutive hours many humans need to be healthy and rested. Instead, the average horse will spend just under three hours per day asleep; this sleep will be spaced out throughout the entire 24-hour time period. It’s rare for an adult horse to spend over 10 minutes asleep at any one time. This means that a horse sleeps between 15 and 21 times a day.

Horses can sleep standing up using a “stay apparatus” that effectively locks their legs in place using a group of ligaments, tendons and muscles. As horses are prey animals, using this mechanism allows the horse to move quickly if any predators are around. Generally, a horse that is resting on three legs is dozing and not actively asleep. When standing, horses tend to keep one or both eyes open, even while dozing. This also allows him to react quickly should a predator threaten.

 

Read Paulick Report Article